Wee Willie Winkie
"Wee Willie Winkie" is a Scottish nursery rhyme, whose titular figure has become popular the world over as a personification of sleep. The poem, written by William Miller and titled "Willie Winkie", w...
Within and Without
Within and Without: A Dramatic Poem is an 1855 poetic play, the first published work of Scottish author George MacDonald. It is written mostly in unrhymed iambic pentameter, although portions are writ...
The Dregy Of Dunbar
The Dregy Of Dunbar also known as Dumbaris Dirige to the King is a humorous poem in Scots and Latin composed by William Dunbar (born 1459 or 1460). at an unknown date.The Dregy is apparently an appea...
Meditatioun In Wyntir
Meditatioun In Wyntir is a contemplative poem in Scots by William Dunbar (born 1459 or 1460).In the work, Dunbar describes how Winter lowers his spirits. While beset by melancholy and insomnia, he me...
The Wallace (poem)
The Actes and Deidis of the Illustre and Vallyeant Campioun Schir William Wallace (English: Acts and Deeds of the Illustrious and Valiant Champion Sir William Wallace), also known as The Wallace, ...
Greysteil
Greysteil ("Graysteel") was a medieval poem popular in 16th century Scotland, set to music and performed for James IV of Scotland and James V of Scotland. The poem was also called Syr Egeir and Syr Gr...
The Kingis Quair
The Kingis Quair ("The King's Book") is a fifteenth-century poem attributed to James I of Scotland. It is semi-autobiographical in nature, describing the King's capture by the English in 1406 on his ...
The Passioun of Crist
The Passioun of Crist, which begins Hail, Cristin knycht, haill, etern confortour... is a long poem in Middle Scots by the Scottish makar Walter Kennedy, who was associated with the renaissance court ...
Lara, A Tale
Lara, A Tale is a rhymed, tragic narrative poem by Lord Byron; first published in 1814. The first work composed after Byron abandoned the idea of giving up writing and buying back his copyrights, it i...
Of Ane Blak-Moir
"Of Ane Blak-Moir" is a short comic poem in Scots by William Dunbar (born 1459 or 1460).It takes the form of a hymn in praise of a beautiful lady, but is a parody of the form. The lady addressed is ap...
Halloween (poem)
"Halloween" is a poem written by the Scottish poet Robert Burns in 1785. First published in 1786, the poem is included in the Kilmarnock volume. It is one of Burns' longer poems, and employs a mixture...
The Petition of The Gray Horse, Auld Dunbar
The Petition Of The Gray Horse, Auld Dunbar is an appeal by the Scots poet William Dunbar to his patron King James IV of Scotland in which he requests a new gown to mark Christmas.In the poem Dunbar p...
The Brus
The Brus (English: The Bruce) is a long narrative poem, in Early Scots, of just under 14,000 octosyllabic lines composed by John Barbour which gives a historic and chivalric account of the actions...
The Wife of Auchtermuchty
The Wife of Auchtermuchty is a Scots poem of the fifteenth or sixteenth centuries.The poem narrates how a farmer, envious of his wife's apparently easy life, proposes that the couple exchange their no...
Marmion (poem)
Marmion is an epic poem by Walter Scott about the Battle of Flodden (1513). It was published in 1808.Scott started writing Marmion, his second major work, in November 1806. When Archibald Constable, t...
The Lay of the Last Minstrel
"The Lay of the Last Minstrel" (1805) is a long narrative poem by Walter Scott. ( It should not be confused with The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, also by Walter Scott, compiled three years previ...
The Taill of Schir Chanticleir and the Foxe
The Taill of Schir Chanticleir and the Foxe is Fabill 3 of Robert Henryson's cycle of thirteen Morall Fabillis composed in Scotland in the later fifteenth century. It is the first of the fabillis in t...
The Corsair
The Corsair is a tale in verse by Lord Byron published in 1814 (see 1814 in poetry), which was extremely popular and influential in its day, selling ten thousand copies on its first day of sale. Its p...
The Castle of Indolence
The Castle of Indolence is a poem written by James Thomson, a Scottish poet of the 18th century, in 1748.According to the Nuttall Encyclopedia, the Castle of Indolence is "a place in which the dweller...
The Fenyeit Freir of Tungland
The Fenyeit Freir of Tungland, also known more fully as Ane Ballat of the Fenyeit Frier of Tungland, How He Fell in the Myre Fleand to Turkiland. is a comic, satirical poem in Scots by William Dunbar ...
The Taill of how this forsaid Tod maid his Confessioun to Freir Wolf Waitskaith
The Taill of how this forsaid Tod maid his Confessioun to Freir Wolf Waitskaith (or The Confessioun of the Tod) is the fourth fabill in Henryson's Morall Fabillis. Its protagonists are a Fox and a Wol...
Ae Fond Kiss
The Scots song "Ae fond kiss and then we sever" by the Scottish poet Robert Burns is more commonly known as "Ae fond kiss". It is Burns' most recorded love song. After the publication of his collected...
Jeanie Deans (poem)
The poem "Jeanie Deans" is by Carolina Oliphant (Lady Nairne) (1766-1845). It eulogizes Jeanie Deans, the heroine of Scott's novel, The Heart of Midlothian. However, it appears to be unfinished as it ...
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage is a lengthy narrative poem in four parts written by Lord Byron. It was published between 1812 and 1818 and is dedicated to "Ianthe". The poem describes the travels and refl...
Bonnie Charlie
"Bonnie Charlie", also commonly known as "Will ye no come back again?", is a Scots poem by Carolina Oliphant (Lady Nairne), set to a traditional Scottish folk tune. As in several of the author's poems...
Harold the Dauntless
Harold the Dauntless is a rhymed, romantic, narrative-poem by Sir Walter Scott. The last of his long verse narratives, written in 1817, it weaves together elements of popular English legends and folkl...