Foot (prosody)
The foot is the basic metrical unit that forms part of a line of verse in most Western traditions of poetry, including English accentual-syllabic verse and the quantitative meter of classical ancient ...
Double amphibrach
The double amphibrach is a variation of the double dactyl, similar to the McWhirtle but with stricter formal requirements. Meter and lineation are consistently amphibrachic (da DA da) rather than dac...
Choriamb
In Greek and Latin poetry, a choriamb /ˈkɔriˌæmb/ is a metron (prosodic foot) consisting of four syllables in the pattern long-short-short-long (— —), that is, a trochee alternating with an iamb. Cho...
Anapaest
An anapaest (also spelled anapæst or anapest, also called antidactylus) is a metrical foot used in formal poetry. In classical quantitative meters it consists of two short syllables followed by a long...
Amphibrach
An amphibrach /ˈæmfibræk/ is a metrical foot used in Latin and Greek prosody. It consists of a long syllable between two short syllables. The word comes from the Greek ἀμφίβραχυς, amphíbrakhys, "short...
Anceps
In Greek and Latin meter, an anceps syllable is a syllable in a metrical line which can be either short or long. An anceps syllable may be called "free" or "irrational" depending on the type of meter...
Spondee
In poetry, a spondee is a metrical foot consisting of two long syllables, as determined by syllable weight in classical meters, or two stressed syllables, as determined by stress in modern meters. Th...
Paeon (prosody)
In prosody a paeon (or paean) is a metrical foot used in both poetry and prose. It consists of four syllables, with one of the syllables being long and the other three short. Paeons were often used in...
Ionic meter
The ionic is a four-syllable metrical unit (metron) of light-light-heavy-heavy ( — —) that occurs in ancient Greek and Latin poetry. Like the choriamb, in classical quantitative verse the ionic never ...
Trochee
In poetic meter, A trochee /ˈtroʊkiː/ or choree, choreus, is a metrical foot consisting of a stressed syllable followed by an unstressed one in English, or a heavy syllable followed by a light one in ...
Molossus (poetry)
A molossus is a metrical foot used in Greek and Latin poetry. It consists of three long syllables. Examples of Latin words constituting molossi are audiri, cantabant, virtutem.In English poetry, sylla...
Cretic
A cretic (also Cretic, amphimacer and sometimes paeon diagyios) is a metrical foot containing three syllables: long, short, long. In Greek poetry, the cretic was usually a form of paeonic or aeolic v...
Dactyl (poetry)
A dactyl (Greek: δάκτυλος, dáktylos, “finger”) is a foot in poetic meter. In quantitative verse, often used in Greek or Latin, a dactyl is a long syllable followed by two short syllables, as deter...
Iamb (poetry)
An iamb /ˈaɪæm/ or iambus is a metrical foot used in various types of poetry. Originally the term referred to one of the feet of the quantitative meter of classical Greek prosody: a short syllable fol...
Iamb (poetry) - Wikipedia
Pyrrhic
A pyrrhic (Greek: πυρρίχιος pyrrichios, from πυρρίχη pyrrichē) is a metrical foot used in formal poetry. It consists of two unaccented, short syllables. It is also known as a dibrach.
Tennyson...