The Gnostics in the Early Christian Era
Gnosis is the common Greek noun for knowledge (in the nominative case γνῶσις f.). In Christian, Islamic, or Jewish mysticism, mystery religions and Gnosticism gnosis generally signifies a spiritual kn...
Henosis
Henosis (Ancient Greek: ἕνωσις) is the word for mystical "oneness," "union," or "unity" in classical Greek.In Platonism, and especially Neoplatonism, the goal of henosis is union with what is fun...
Henotheism
Henotheism (Greek εἷς θεός heis theos "one god") is the belief in and worship of a single God while accepting the existence or possible existence of other deities that may also be worshipped. The term...
Early Christianity
Early Christianity is the period of Christianity preceding the First Council of Nicaea in 325. It is typically divided into the Apostolic Age and the Ante-Nicene Period (from the Apostolic Age until N...
Noetic Consciousness
In philosophy, noetics is a branch of metaphysical philosophy concerned with the study of mind and intellect. Noetic topics include the doctrine of the agent/patient intellect (Aristotle, Averroes) an...
God as the Devil
In Christian heresiology, there have been historical claims that certain Christian sects worshipped the devil. This was especially an issue in the reaction of the early Church to Gnosticism and its du...
Problem of evil
In the philosophy of religion, the problem of evil is the question of how to reconcile the existence of evil with that of a deity who is, in either absolute or relative terms, omnipotent, omniscient, ...
List of early Christian texts of disputed authorship
There are a number of Early Christian writings whose authorship is in dispute.
Christology
Christology (from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology which is primarily concerned with the nature and person of Jesus as recorded in the canonic...
Apocatastasis
Apocatastasis (/æpoʊkəˈtæstəsɨs/; from Greek: ἀποκατάστασις, also anglicized as apokatastasis) is reconstitution, restitution, or restoration to the original or primordial condition.
The Lidde...
Sabbath in Christianity
Sabbath in Christianity is a weekly day of rest or religious observance, derived from the Biblical Sabbath. In the 2nd century AD, the observance of a corporate day of worship on the first day (Sunday...
Church Fathers
The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and generally influential Christian theologians, some of whom were eminent teachers and great bishops....
Problem of Hell
The problem of Hell is an ethical problem in religion where the notion of Hell as existing for the punishment of souls is regarded as inconsistent with notion of an omnibenevolent God. It derives fro...
Christian eschatology
Christian eschatology is a major branch of study within Christian theology. Eschatology, from two Greek words meaning "last" (ἔσχατος) and "study" (-λογία), is the study of 'end things', whether the e...
History of early Christianity
The history of early Christianity covers Christianity from its origins to the First Council of Nicaea in 325.The first part of the period, during the lifetimes of the Twelve Apostles, is traditionally...
Noology
Noology or Noölogy derives from the Greek words νοῦς, nous or "mind" and λόγος, logos.Noology thus outlines a systematic study and organization of everything dealing with knowing and knowledge.It is a...
Essentialism
Essentialism is the view that, for any specific entity (such as an animal, a group of people, a physical object, a concept), there is a set of attributes which are necessary to its identity and functi...
Ignosticism
Ignosticism or igtheism is the idea that every theological position assumes too much about the concept of God and other theological concepts; including (but not limited to) concepts of faith, spiritua...
Causality
Causality (also referred to as causation) is the relation between an event (the cause) and a second event (the effect), where the second event is understood as a physical consequence of the first.In c...
Satan
Satan (Hebrew: שָּׂטָן satan, meaning "adversary"; Arabic: شيطان shaitan, meaning "astray" or "distant", sometimes "devil") is a figure appearing in the texts of the Abrahamic religions who brings evi...
Emanation
Emanationism is an idea in the cosmology or cosmogony of certain religious or philosophical systems. Emanation, from the Latin emanare meaning "to flow from" or "to pour forth or out of", is the mode ...
Divinity of Christ
Christology (from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology which is primarily concerned with the nature and person of Jesus as recorded in the canonic...
Development of the Christian biblical canon
The Christian biblical canons are the books Christians regard as divinely inspired and constituting a Christian Bible. Books included in the Christian biblical canons of both the Old and New Testament...
Greek hero cult
Hero cults were one of the most distinctive features of ancient Greek religion. In Homeric Greek, "hero" (ἥρως, hērōs) refers to a man who was fighting on either side during the Trojan War. By the hi...
Pauline Christianity
Pauline Christianity is the Christianity associated with the beliefs and doctrines espoused by Paul the Apostle through his writings. Most of Christianity relies heavily on these teachings and conside...
First Council of Nicaea
The First Council of Nicaea (/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈni:kaɪja]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Nicaea in Bithynia by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325. This first ecum...
List of early Christian writers
Various Early Christian writers wrote gospels and other books, some of which were canonized as the New Testament canon developed. The Apostolic Fathers were prominent writers who are traditionally und...
Diversity in early Christian theology
Traditionally, orthodoxy and heresy have been viewed in relation to the "orthodoxy" as an authentic lineage of tradition. Other forms of Christianity were viewed as deviant streams of thought and ther...
Baptism in early Christianity
Baptism has been part of Christianity from the start, as shown by the many mentions in the Acts of the Apostles and the Pauline epistles. Christians consider Jesus to have instituted the sacrament of ...
Apostolic Fathers
The Apostolic Fathers is a term used to describe a group of Early Christian writings produced in the late 1st century and the first half of the 2nd century. These writings, though not unpopular in Ear...