Reference
Americans are celebrating a new arrival to Washington D.C. -- one that is 500 years old. A celebration at the Library of Congress on April 30 marked the arri...
Linguistic typology
Linguistic typology is a subfield of linguistics that studies and classifies languages according to their structural and functional features. Its aim is to describe and explain the common properties a...
Pseudogapping
Pseudogapping is an ellipsis mechanism that elides most but not all of a non-finite verb phrase; at least one part of the verb phrase remains, which is called the remnant. Pseudogapping occurs in comp...
Pseudogapping - Wikipedia
Specified subject condition
The Specified Subject Condition (SSC) is a condition proposed in Chomsky (1973) which restricts the application of certain syntactic transformational rules. In many ways it is a counterpart to the Ten...
Antisymmetry
In linguistics, antisymmetry is a theory of syntactic linearization presented in Richard Kayne's 1994 monograph The Antisymmetry of Syntax. The crux of this theory is that hierarchical structure in na...
Antisymmetry - Wikipedia
Medical specialties
A specialty (or speciality) in medicine is a branch of medical practice. After completing medical school, physicians or surgeons usually further their medical education in a specific specialty of medi...
Coordination (linguistics)
In linguistics, coordination is a frequently occurring complex syntactic structure that links together two or more elements, known as conjuncts or conjoins. The presence of coordination is often signa...
Coordination (linguistics) - Wikipedia
Object–verb–subject
In linguistic typology, object–verb–subject (OVS) or object–verb–agent (OVA) is a rare permutation of word order. OVS denotes the sequence object–verb–subject in unmarked expressions: Oranges ate Sam,...
Extraposition
Extraposition is a mechanism of syntax that alters word order in such a manner that a relatively "heavy" constituent appears to the right of its canonical position. Extraposing a constituent results i...
Extraposition - Wikipedia
C-command
c-command (constituent command) is a relationship between the nodes of grammatical parse trees. It is closely associated with the phrase structure grammars of the Chomskyan tradition (Government and B...
C-command - Wikipedia
Ellipsis (linguistics)
In linguistics, ellipsis (from the Greek: ἔλλειψις, élleipsis, "omission") or elliptical construction refers to the omission from a clause of one or more words that are nevertheless understood in ...
Lexical rule
A lexical rule is in a form of syntactic rule used within many theories of natural language syntax. These rules alter the argument structures of lexical items (for example verbs and declensions) in or...
Antecedent (grammar)
In grammar, an antecedent is an expression (word, phrase, clause, etc.) that gives its meaning to a pro-form (pronoun, pro-verb, pro-adverb, etc.). A proform takes its meaning from its antecedent, e.g...
Raising (linguistics)
In linguistics, raising is the construction where a given predicate/verb takes a dependent that is not its semantic argument, but rather it is the semantic argument of an embedded predicate. In other ...
Raising (linguistics) - Wikipedia
Nearest referent
The nearest referent is a grammatical term sometimes used when two or more possible referents of a pronoun, or other part of speech, cause ambiguity in a text. However "nearness", proximity, may not b...
Dynamic antisymmetry
Antisymmetry is a theory of syntactic linearization presented in Richard Kayne's 1994 monograph The Antisymmetry of Syntax. The crux of this theory is that hierarchical structure in natural language m...
Answer ellipsis
Answer ellipsis (= answer fragments) is a type of ellipsis that occurs in answers to questions. Answer ellipsis appears very frequently in any dialogue, and it is present in probably all languages. Of...
Answer ellipsis - Wikipedia