Reference
Americans are celebrating a new arrival to Washington D.C. -- one that is 500 years old. A celebration at the Library of Congress on April 30 marked the arri...
Linguistic typology
Linguistic typology is a subfield of linguistics that studies and classifies languages according to their structural and functional features. Its aim is to describe and explain the common properties a...
Branching (linguistics)
In linguistics, branching refers to the shape of the parse trees that represent the structure of sentences. Assuming that the language is being written or transcribed from left to right, parse trees t...
Head directionality parameter
In linguistics, the head directionality is a proposed parameter that classifies languages according to whether they are head-initial (the head of a phrase precedes its complements) or head-final (th...
Pseudogapping
Pseudogapping is an ellipsis mechanism that elides most but not all of a non-finite verb phrase; at least one part of the verb phrase remains, which is called the remnant. Pseudogapping occurs in comp...
Specified subject condition
The Specified Subject Condition (SSC) is a condition proposed in Chomsky (1973) which restricts the application of certain syntactic transformational rules. In many ways it is a counterpart to the Ten...
Center embedding
In linguistics, center embedding refers to the process of embedding a phrase in the middle of another phrase of the same type. This often leads to difficulty with parsing which would be difficult to ...
Agreement (linguistics)
Agreement or concord happens when a word changes form depending on the other words to which it relates. It is an instance of inflection, and usually involves making the value of some grammatical categ...
Nominative–accusative language
Nominative–accusative is a form of morphosyntactic alignment in which subjects of transitive and intransitive verbs are distinguished from objects of transitive verbs through word order, case marking,...
Antisymmetry
In linguistics, antisymmetry is a theory of syntactic linearization presented in Richard Kayne's 1994 monograph The Antisymmetry of Syntax. The crux of this theory is that hierarchical structure in na...
Object–verb–subject
In linguistic typology, object–verb–subject (OVS) or object–verb–agent (OVA) is a rare permutation of word order. OVS denotes the sequence object–verb–subject in unmarked expressions: Oranges ate Sam,...
Extraposition
Extraposition is a mechanism of syntax that alters word order in such a manner that a relatively "heavy" constituent appears to the right of its canonical position. Extraposing a constituent results i...
Figures of speech
A figure of speech is figurative language in the form of a single word or phrase. It can be a special repetition, arrangement or omission of words with literal meaning, or a phrase with a specialized...
Nominative–absolutive language
A nominative–absolutive language, also called a marked nominative language, is a language with an unusual morphosyntactic alignment similar to, and often considered a subtype of, a nominative–accusati...
Coreference
In linguistics, coreference (sometimes written co-reference) occurs when two or more expressions in a text refer to the same person or thing; they have the same referent, e.g. Billi said hei would com...
C-command
c-command (constituent command) is a relationship between the nodes of grammatical parse trees. It is closely associated with the phrase structure grammars of the Chomskyan tradition (Government and B...
History of books
The history of books, or book history is the historical account of the development of books.
Writing is a system of linguistic symbols permitting one to transmit and conserve information. Writing ...