Social epistemology
Social epistemology refers to a broad set of approaches to the study of knowledge that construes human knowledge as a collective achievement. Another way of characterizing social epistemology is as th...
Accountability
In ethics and governance, accountability is answerability, blameworthiness, liability, and the expectation of account-giving. As an aspect of governance, it has been central to discussions related to ...
Social constructionism
Social constructionism or the social construction of reality (also social concept) is a theory of knowledge in sociology and communication theory that examines the development of jointly constructed u...
Feminist philosophy
Feminist philosophy refers to philosophy approached from a feminist perspective. Feminist philosophy involves both attempts to use the methods of philosophy to further the cause of the feminist moveme...
Social choice theory
Social choice theory or social choice is a theoretical framework for analysis of combining individual opinions, preferences, interests, or welfares to reach a collective decision or social welfare in...
Sociology of knowledge
The sociology of knowledge is the study of the relationship between human thought and the social context within which it arises, and of the effects prevailing ideas have on societies. It is not a spec...
Sociology of science
The sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) is the study of science as a social activity, especially dealing with "the social conditions and effects of science, and with the social structures and proc...
Social Epistemology (journal)
Social Epistemology: A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal. It was established in 1987 and is published by Routledge in collaboration with the Societ...
Perjury
Perjury, also known as forswearing, is the intentional act of swearing a false oath or of falsifying an affirmation to tell the truth, whether spoken or in writing, concerning matters material to an o...
Performativity
Performativity is a term for the capacity of speech and communication not simply to communicate but rather to act or consummate an action, or to construct and perform an identity. A common example is ...
Gibbard–Satterthwaite theorem
The Gibbard–Satterthwaite theorem, named after Allan Gibbard and Mark Satterthwaite, is a result about the deterministic voting systems that choose a single winner using only the preferences of the v...
Nakamura number
In cooperative game theory and social choice theory, the Nakamura number measures the degree of rationalityof preference aggregation rules (collective decision rules), such as voting rules.It is an in...
Feminist epistemology
Feminist epistemology is an examination of the subject matter of epistemology, i.e., the theory of knowledge from a feminist standpoint. Elizabeth Anderson describes it as being concerned with the way...
Collective mental state
Mental state is generally a literary or legal term, and is only used in psychiatry or psychology as the mental state examination, where it refers to the condition of someone's mind. Here there is an ...
Closing argument
A closing argument, summation, or summing up is the concluding statement of each party's counsel reiterating the important arguments for the trier of fact, often the jury, in a court case. A closing a...
Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy
Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy is a peer-reviewed academic journal published quarterly by Wiley-Blackwell that covers feminist philosophy. The editor-in-chief is Sally Scholz (Villanova Uni...
Boundary-work
In science studies, boundary-work comprises instances in which boundaries, demarcations, or other divisions between fields of knowledge are created, advocated, attacked, or reinforced. Academic schola...
Cross-examination
In law, cross-examination is the interrogation of a witness called by one's opponent. It is preceded by direct examination (in the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, South Africa, India and Pakistan k...
Testimony
In law and in religion, testimony is a solemn attestation as to the truth of a matter.
The words "testimony" and "testify" both have a root in the Latin testis, referring to the notion of a third ...
Hearsay
Hearsay evidence is "an out-of-court statement introduced to prove the truth of the matter asserted therein." In certain courts hearsay evidence is inadmissible (the "Hearsay Evidence Rule") unless ...
Boundary object
In sociology, a boundary object is information, such as specimens, field notes, and maps, used in different ways by different communities. Boundary object are plastic, interpreted differently across c...
Extended sympathy
Extended sympathy in welfare economics refers to interpersonal value judgments of the form that social state x for person A is ranked better than, worse than, or as good as social state y for person B...
Human responsibilities
Human responsibilities are the universal responsibilities of human beings regardless of jurisdiction or other factors, such as ethnicity, nationality, religion, or sex.The idea of human responsibiliti...
Science, technology and society
Science, technology and society (STS), also referred to as science and technology studies is a branch or offspring of science studies. It considers how social, political, and cultural values affect sc...
Peace Testimony
Peace testimony, or testimony against war, is a shorthand description of the action generally taken by members of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) for peace and against participation in war....
Androcentrism
Androcentrism (Ancient Greek, ἀνήρ, "man, male") is the practice, conscious or otherwise, of placing male human beings or the masculine point of view at the center of one's view of the world and its c...
Epistemology of Wikipedia
Epistemology is a major branch of philosophy and is concerned with the nature and scope of knowledge. The epistemology of Wikipedia has been a subject of interest from the earliest days of its existe...
Cardinal voting systems
Cardinal voting systems are voting systems which allow the voter to give each candidate an independent rating or grade from among at least two levels of approval. Along with ordinal voting systems (al...