Slavery in the United States
Slavery in the United States was the legal institution of chattel slavery that existed in the United States of America in the 18th and 19th centuries after it gained independence and before the end of...
8 Key Contributors To The Underground Railroad
In the decades preceding the Civil War, up to 100,000 slaves escaped to the Northern free states or the “promised land” of Canada. Most received help along the way from abolitionists, who ran a vast, ...
Black Loyalists
A Black Loyalist was an inhabitant of British America of African descent who joined British colonial forces during the American Revolutionary War. Many were slaves held by Patriot rebels, and decided ...
Freedmen
A freedman is a former slave who has been released from slavery, usually by legal means. Historically, slaves became freedmen either by manumission (granted freedom by their owner) or emancipation (gr...
Bleeding Kansas
Bleeding Kansas, Bloody Kansas or the Border War was a series of violent political confrontations in the United States involving anti-slavery Free-Staters and pro-slavery "Border Ruffian" elements, th...
Reparations for slavery
Reparations for slavery is the idea that some form of compensatory payment should be made to the descendants of Africans who had been enslaved by the Atlantic Slave Trade.
In 1999, the African Wor...
Prince Hall
Prince Hall (1735—1807) was an African American noted as a tireless abolitionist, for his leadership in the free black community in Boston, and as the founder of Prince Hall Freemasonry.Hall tried to ...
8 Key Contributors To The Underground Railroad
In the decades preceding the Civil War, up to 100,000 slaves escaped to the Northern free states or the “promised land” of Canada. Most received help along the way from abolitionists, who ran a vast, ...
Jordan Winston Early
The Reverend Jordan Winston Early (1814 – after 1894) was an American Methodist multiracial preacher, considered to have been one of the pioneers of African Methodism in the West and South of the Unit...
Missouri Compromise
The Missouri Compromise was a federal statute in the United States that regulated slavery in the country's western territories. The compromise, devised by Henry Clay, was agreed to by the pro-slavery ...
Shields Green
Shields Green (1836?-1859), also known as "Emperor," was an ex-slave who participated in John Brown's unsuccessful raid on Harpers Ferry. Though he had a chance to escape capture, he returned to the ...
York (explorer)
York (1770–1822) was an African-American slave best known for his participation with the Lewis and Clark Expedition. As William Clark's slave, he performed hard manual labor without pay, but pa...
Carter Braxton
Carter Braxton (September 10, 1736 – October 10, 1797) was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence, as well as a merchant, planter, and Virginia politician. A grandson of Robert “Ki...
Lewis Clarke
Lewis Clarke was an ex-slave who published his experiences in his work, Narrative of the Sufferings of Lewis Clarke.
Lewis Garrard Clarke was born in Madison County, Kentucky, seven miles from Ric...
Dred Scott
Dred Scott (circa 1799 – September 17, 1858) was an enslaved African American man in the United States who unsuccessfully sued for his freedom and that of his wife and their two daughters in the Dred ...
Lewis Hayden
Lewis Hayden (December 2, 1811 – April 7, 1889) was an African-American leader who escaped with his family from slavery in Kentucky; they moved to Boston, where he became an abolitionist and lecturer,...
Issaquena County, Mississippi
Issaquena County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 1,406, making it the least populous county east of the Mississippi River. Its county se...
The Washington Family
The Washington Family by Edward Savage is a life-sized group portrait of U. S. President George Washington, First Lady Martha Washington, two of her grandchildren, and an enslaved servant. Based on li...