Silicon dioxide
Silicon dioxide, also known as silica (from the Latin silex), is a chemical compound that is an oxide of silicon with the chemical formula SiO2. It has been known since ancient times. Silica is most c...
Silicon dioxide - Wikipedia
New Glass Manufacturing Technique Could Enable Design Of Hybrid Glasses And Revolutionise Gas Storage
The work revolves around a family of compounds called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which are cage-like structures consisting of metal ions, linked by organic bonds. Their porous properties have le...
Making New Materials With Micro-Explosions
Scientists have made exotic new materials by creating laser-induced micro-explosions in silicon, the common computer chip material. The new technique could lead to the simple creation and manufacture ...
Glass
Glass is an amorphous (non-crystalline) solid material which is often transparent and has widespread practical, technological, and decorative usage in things like window panes, tableware, and optoelec...
Glass - Wikipedia
Hydrophobic silica
Hydrophobic silica is a form of silicon dioxide, commonly known as silica, that has hydrophobic groups chemically bonded to the surface. The hydrophobic groups are normally alkyl or polydimethylsiloxa...
New Glass Manufacturing Technique Could Enable Design Of Hybrid Glasses And Revolutionise Gas Storage
The work revolves around a family of compounds called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which are cage-like structures consisting of metal ions, linked by organic bonds. Their porous properties have le...
Silica fume
Silica fume, also known as microsilica, (CAS number 69012-64-2, EINECS number 273-761-1) is an amorphous (non-crystalline) polymorph of silicon dioxide, silica. It is an ultrafine powder collected as ...
Silica fume - Wikipedia
History of optics
Optics began with the development of lenses by the ancient Egyptians and Mesopotamians, followed by theories on light and vision developed by ancient Greek and Indian philosophers, and the development...
History of optics - Wikipedia
Precipitated silica
Precipitated silica is a silica (SiO2) produced by precipitation from a solution containing silicate salts. In 1999, more than 1M tons/y were produced, mainly for use in tires and shoe soles.
Th...
Glass physics
Glass is an amorphous (non-crystalline) solid material which is often transparent and has widespread practical, technological, and decorative usage in things like window panes, tableware, and optoelec...
Glass physics - Wikipedia
Total internal reflection
Total internal reflection is a phenomenon that happens when a propagating wave strikes a medium boundary at an angle larger than a particular critical angle with respect to the normal to the surface....
Total internal reflection - Wikipedia
Lycurgus Cup
The Lycurgus Cup is a 4th-century Roman glass cage cup made of a dichroic glass, which shows a different colour depending on whether or not light is passing through it; red when lit from behind and g...
Lycurgus Cup - Wikipedia
Egyptian faience
Egyptian faience is a sintered-quartz ceramic displaying surface vitrification which creates a bright lustre of various colours, with blue-green being the most common. Defined as a “material made fro...
Egyptian faience - Wikipedia
Hebron glass
Hebron Glass (Arabic: زجاج الخليل‎, zajaj al-Khalili ) refers to glass produced in Hebron as part of a flourishing art industry established in the city during Roman rule in Palestine. Hebron...
Hebron glass - Wikipedia
Forest glass
Forest glass (Waldglas in German) is late Medieval glass produced in North-Western and Central Europe from about 1000-1700 AD using wood ash and sand as the main raw materials and made in factories k...
Forest glass - Wikipedia
Hermann von Münster
Hermann von Münster (c. 1330 - March 1392) was a German master glassmaker, native of Münster, in Westphalia, and active in Lorraine.
Hermman von Münster is actually the first stained glass artist...
Hermann von Münster - Wikipedia
Goofus glass
Goofus glass is pressed glass which was decorated with cold, unfired paint in the early 20th century in America by several prominent glass factories. Because it was mass-produced and relatively cheap,...
Glass wool
Glass wool is an insulating material made from fibres of glass arranged using a binder into a texture similar to wool. The process traps many small pockets of air between the glass, and these small ai...
Glass wool - Wikipedia
Prince Rupert's Drop
Prince Rupert's Drops (also known as Dutch tears) are glass objects created by dripping molten glass into cold water. The glass cools into a tadpole-shaped droplet with a long, thin tail. The water ra...
Prince Rupert's Drop - Wikipedia
John Thornton (glass painter)
John Thornton of Coventry (fl. 1405-1433) was a master glazier and stained glass artist active in England during the 15th century. The output of his workshop includes some of the finest English mediev...
John Thornton (glass painter) - Wikipedia
Liquidus
The liquidus temperature, TL or Tliq specifies the temperature above which a material is completely liquid, and the maximum temperature at which crystals can co-exist with the melt in thermodynamic eq...
Liquidus - Wikipedia
Rhinestone
A rhinestone, paste or diamante is a diamond simulant made from rock crystal, glass or acrylic. Originally, rhinestones were rock crystals gathered from the river Rhine, hence the name, although some ...
Rhinestone - Wikipedia
Hellenistic glass
Hellenistic glass was glass produced during the Hellenistic period, from the conquests of Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) to the expansion of the Roman Empire (second half of the 1st century BC - 47...
Hellenistic glass - Wikipedia
J&R Lamb Studios
J is the tenth letter in the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its normal name in English is jay /ˈdʒeɪ/ or jy /ˈdʒaɪ/. When used in the International phonetic alphabet for the /j/ sound, it may be called yod...
Cage cup
A cage cup,(Ancient Greek: Λυκουργος Ποτήρι ), also vas diatretum, plural diatreta, or "reticulated cup" is a type of luxury Late Roman glass vessel, found from roughly the 4th century, and "t...
Cage cup - Wikipedia
Heatwork
Heatwork is the combined effect of temperature and time. It is important to several industries:Pyrometric devices can be used to gauge heat work as they deform or contract due to heatwork to produce t...