Silica
Silicon dioxide, also known as silica (from the Latin silex), is a chemical compound that is an oxide of silicon with the chemical formula SiO2. It has been known since ancient times. Silica is most c...
New Glass Manufacturing Technique Could Enable Design Of Hybrid Glasses And Revolutionise Gas Storage
The work revolves around a family of compounds called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which are cage-like structures consisting of metal ions, linked by organic bonds. Their porous properties have le...
Glass
Glass is an amorphous (non-crystalline) solid material which is often transparent and has widespread practical, technological, and decorative usage in things like window panes, tableware, and optoelec...
New Glass Manufacturing Technique Could Enable Design Of Hybrid Glasses And Revolutionise Gas Storage
The work revolves around a family of compounds called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which are cage-like structures consisting of metal ions, linked by organic bonds. Their porous properties have le...
Glass physics
Glass is an amorphous (non-crystalline) solid material which is often transparent and has widespread practical, technological, and decorative usage in things like window panes, tableware, and optoelec...
Verreville Glass and Pottery Works, Glasgow
Verreville Glassworks was established on the north bank of the River Clyde in the village of Finnieston in 1777. Glass making was discontinued in 1842. The buildings of the works, including the 120 fe...
Glass microsphere
Glass microspheres are microscopic spheres of glass manufactured for a wide variety of uses in research, medicine, consumer goods and various industries. Glass microspheres are usually between 1 to 10...
Metropolitan
Metropolitan may refer to:
Egyptian faience
Egyptian faience is a sintered-quartz ceramic displaying surface vitrification which creates a bright lustre of various colours, with blue-green being the most common. Defined as a “material made fro...
Hebron glass
Hebron Glass (Arabic: زجاج الخليل‎, zajaj al-Khalili ) refers to glass produced in Hebron as part of a flourishing art industry established in the city during Roman rule in Palestine. Hebron...
Hermann von Münster
Hermann von Münster (c. 1330 - March 1392) was a German master glassmaker, native of Münster, in Westphalia, and active in Lorraine.
Hermman von Münster is actually the first stained glass artist...
Softening point
The softening point is the temperature at which a material softens beyond some arbitrary softness. It can be determined, for example, by the Vicat method (ASTM-D1525 or ISO 306), Heat Deflection Test ...
Goofus glass
Goofus glass is pressed glass which was decorated with cold, unfired paint in the early 20th century in America by several prominent glass factories. Because it was mass-produced and relatively cheap,...
Liquidus
The liquidus temperature, TL or Tliq specifies the temperature above which a material is completely liquid, and the maximum temperature at which crystals can co-exist with the melt in thermodynamic eq...
Rhinestone
A rhinestone, paste or diamante is a diamond simulant made from rock crystal, glass or acrylic. Originally, rhinestones were rock crystals gathered from the river Rhine, hence the name, although some ...
Glass production
Glass production involves two main methods – the float glass process which produces sheet glass, and glassblowing which produces bottles and other containers.
Broadly, modern glass container facto...
Volcanic glass
Volcanic glass is the amorphous (uncrystallized) product of rapidly cooling magma. Like all types of glass, it is a state of matter intermediate between the close-packed, highly ordered array of a cr...
Hellenistic glass
Hellenistic glass was glass produced during the Hellenistic period, from the conquests of Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) to the expansion of the Roman Empire (second half of the 1st century BC - 47...
J&R Lamb Studios
J is the tenth letter in the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its normal name in English is jay /ˈdʒeɪ/ or jy /ˈdʒaɪ/. When used in the International phonetic alphabet for the /j/ sound, it may be called yod...
Cage cup
A cage cup,(Ancient Greek: Λυκουργος Ποτήρι ), also vas diatretum, plural diatreta, or "reticulated cup" is a type of luxury Late Roman glass vessel, found from roughly the 4th century, and "t...
Rayonnant
In French Gothic architecture, Rayonnant ([ʁɛjɔnɑ̃]) was the period between c. 1240 and 1350, characterized by a shift in focus away from the High Gothic mode of utilizing great scale and spatial rati...
Heatwork
Heatwork is the combined effect of temperature and time. It is important to several industries:Pyrometric devices can be used to gauge heat work as they deform or contract due to heatwork to produce t...
Tanada effect
The Tanada effect refers to the adhesion of root tips to glass surfaces. It is believed to involve electric potentials. It is named for the scientist who first described the effect, Takuma Tanada.The ...
Portland Vase
The Portland Vase is a Roman cameo glass vase, which is dated to between AD 1 and AD 25, though low BC dates have some scholarly support. It is the best known piece of Roman cameo glass and has served...
Glass of antimony
Glass of antimony, vitrum antimonii, is a transparent glass created from a preparation of antimony, historically used as an emetic. It was created using crude antimony, ground and calcined by a veheme...
Depression glass
Depression glass is clear or colored translucent glassware that was distributed free, or at low cost, in the United States and Canada around the time of the Great Depression. Depression glass is a sub...
Planetarium Jena
The Zeiss-Planetarium in Jena, Germany is the oldest continuously operating planetarium in the world. It was opened on July 18, 1926. The Zeiss-Planetarium is a projection planetarium. The planets and...