Riddle
A riddle is a statement or question or phrase having a double or veiled meaning, put forth as a puzzle to be solved. Riddles are of two types: enigmas, which are problems generally expressed in metaph...
Kuwaiti preacher, ISIS call for demolition of Egypt'€s Sphinx, pyramids
An Islamist preacher from Kuwait has called to destroy Egypt's Sphinx and pyramids, stating it is time for Muslims to erase the pharaohs' heritage. The alleged call comes as Islamic State jihadists ra...
NEW!! Secrets of Egypt Bewilder Scientist!tombs
Secrets of the Egypt Bewilder Scientist! When it comes to ancient Egypt nothing is more highly debated than the age of the Sphinx!
Mysterious Missing Dollar Riddle/Magic Trick
Magician Rich Ferguson shares a fun, magical riddle involving $30. Magic Tutorial: http://tinyurl.com/missingdollar Three people go into a store to buy 3 DVD's. They pay $10 each. However, they are g...
Jester
A jester was an historical entertainer either employed to entertain a ruler or other nobility in medieval or Tudor times or was an itinerant performer who entertained common folk at fairs and markets....
Ludwig Wittgenstein
Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (/ˈvɪtɡənˌstaɪn/; [ˈvɪtgənˌʃtaɪn]; 26 April 1889 – 29 April 1951) was an Austrian-British philosopher who worked primarily in logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the...
Wedding of Ceyx
The Wedding of Ceyx (Ancient Greek: Κήυκος γάμος, Kḗykos gámos) is a fragmentary Ancient Greek hexameter poem that was attributed to Hesiod during antiquity. The fragments that survive imply tha...
Qualia
Qualia (/ˈkwɑːliə/ or /ˈkweɪliə/; singular form: quale) is a term used in philosophy to refer to individual instances of subjective, conscious experience. The term derives from the Latin adverb quālis...
Elephant joke
An elephant joke is a joke, almost always an absurd riddle or conundrum and often a sequence of such, that involves an elephant. Elephant jokes were a fad in the 1960s, with many people constructing l...
Eustathios Makrembolites
Eustathios Makrembolites (Greek: Εὐστάθιος Μακρεμβολίτης), Latinized as Eustathius Macrembolites, was a Byzantine revivalist of the Greek romance, flourished in the second half of the 12th century...
George Berkeley
George Berkeley (/ˈbɑrkleɪ/ or /ˈbɑrklɪ/; 12 March 1685 – 14 January 1753), also known as Bishop Berkeley (Bishop of Cloyne), was an Anglo-Irish philosopher whose primary achievement wa...
All that glitters is not gold
All that glitters is not gold is a well-known saying, meaning that not everything that looks precious or true turns out to be so. This can apply to people, places, or things that promise to be more th...
Riddler
The Riddler (Dr. Edward Nigma) is a fictional comic book supervillain appearing in comic books published by DC Comics. He usually appears as an enemy of Batman. Created by writer Bill Finger and artis...
Logical positivism
Logical positivism and logical empiricism, which together formed neopositivism, was a movement in Western philosophy that embraced verificationism, an approach that sought to legitimize philosophical ...
King John and the Bishop
King John and the Bishop is an English folk-song dating back at least to the 16th century. It is catalogued in Child Ballads as number 45 and Roud Folk Song Index 302.It tells how King John, covetous ...
Harlequin
Harlequin (/ˈhɑrləˌkwɪn/; Italian: Arlecchino, French: Arlequin) is the most well known of the zanni or comic servant characters from the Italian Commedia dell'arte. Traditionally believed to ...
Newspaper riddle
The newspaper riddle is a riddle joke or conundrum that begins with the question:The traditional answer, which relies upon the fact that the words "red" and "read" are homophones, is:Barrick believes ...
Hershele Ostropoler
Hershel of Ostropol (Yiddish: Hershele Ostropoler) is a prominent figure in Jewish humor. Hershele was a prankster from Ostropol, Ukraine, who lived in poverty and targeted the rich and powerful, ...
Balatro
In ancient Rome, a balatro was a professional jester or buffoon. Balatrones were paid for their jests, and the tables of the wealthy were generally open to them for the sake of the amusement they affo...
Dada
Dada (/ˈdɑːdɑː/) or Dadaism was an art movement of the European avant-garde in the early 20th century. Dada in Zurich, Switzerland, began in 1916, spreading to Berlin shortly thereafter, but the heigh...
Bomolochus
In the theatre of ancient Greece, the bômolochus (Ancient Greek: βωμολόχος) was one of three stock characters in comedy, corresponding to the English buffoon. The bômolochus is marked by his wit,...
As I was going to St Ives
"As I was going to St Ives" is a traditional English-language nursery rhyme in the form of a riddle. Its Roud Folk Song Index number is 19772.
The most common modern version is: As I was going to ...
Gibberish (language game)
Gibberish (sometimes Jibberish) is a language game or secret language similar to Pig Latin that is played in the United States, Canada and Ireland. Similar games are played in many other countries. Th...
Dagonet
Sir Dagonet was King Arthur's well-beloved jester, and a Knight of the Round Table of Arthurian legend. He saw himself as a courageous warrior and would present himself as such. Yet, in reality, he wo...
Jabberwocky
Jabberwocky is a nonsense poem written by Lewis Carroll and included in his 1871 novel Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There, a sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. The book tel...
Anglo-Saxon riddles
Anglo-Saxon Riddles are part of Anglo-Saxon literature. The most famous Anglo-Saxon riddles are found in the Exeter Book, though Latin Riddles were also composed by Anglo-Saxons, most famously Aldhelm...
Codex Cumanicus
The Codex Cumanicus was a linguistic manual of the Middle Ages, designed to help Catholic missionaries communicate with the Cumans, a nomadic Turkic people. It is currently housed in the Library of St...
Sphinx
A sphinx (Greek: Σφίγξ /sphinx/, Bœotian: Φίξ /Phix, Arabic: أبو الهول,) is a mythical creature with, as a minimum, the body of a lion and a human head.In Greek tradition, it has the haunches of a lio...