René Descartes
René Descartes (/ˈdeɪˌkɑrt/; [ʁəne dekaʁt]; Latinized: Renatus Cartesius; adjectival form: "Cartesian"; 31 March 1596 – 11 February 1650) was a French philosopher, mathematician and wri...
Mind-body dichotomy
The mind–body problem in philosophy examines the relationship between mind and matter, and in particular the relationship between consciousness and the brain.The problem was famously addressed by René...
Dualism
Dualism (from the Latin word duo meaning "two") denotes the state of two parts. The term 'dualism' was originally coined to denote co-eternal binary opposition, a meaning that is preserved in metaphys...
Soul dualism
Soul dualism or a dualistic soul concept is a range of beliefs that a person has two (or more) kinds of souls. In many cases, one of the souls is associated with body functions (“body soul") and the o...
Cartesian Other
The Cartesian Other is the counterpart to the Cartesian Self. According to Descartes, there is a divide intrinsic to human consciousness, such that you cannot ever bridge the space between your own co...
Dioptrique
La dioptrique (in English Dioptrique, Optics, or Dioptrics), is a short treatise published in 1637 included in one of the Essays written with Discourse on the Method by Rene Descartes. In this essay D...
Discourse on the Method
The Discourse on the Method is a philosophical and autobiographical treatise published by René Descartes in 1637. Its full name is Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting One's Reason and of See...
Cartesian coordinate system
A Cartesian coordinate system is a coordinate system that specifies each point uniquely in a plane by a pair of numerical coordinates, which are the signed distances from the point to two fixed perpen...
Theodicy
Theodicy (/θiːˈɒdɪsi/), in its most common form, is the attempt to answer the question of why a good God permits the manifestation of evil. Theodicy attempts to resolve the evidential problem of evil ...
Rules for the Direction of the Mind
In 1628 or a few years earlier, René Descartes began work on an unfinished treatise regarding the proper method for scientific and philosophical thinking entitled Regulae ad directionem ingenii, or Ru...
Folium of Descartes
In geometry, the folium of Descartes is an algebraic curve defined by the equation It forms a loop in the first quadrant with a double point at the origin and asymptote It is symmetrical about .The na...
Cartesian materialism
In philosophy of mind, Cartesian materialism is the idea that at some place (or places) in the brain, there is some set of information that directly corresponds to our conscious experience. Contrary t...
The Description of the Human Body
The Description of the Human Body (French: La description du corps humain) is an unfinished treatise written in 1647 by René Descartes. Descartes felt knowing oneself was particularly useful. Thi...
Meditations on First Philosophy
Meditations on First Philosophy (subtitled In which the existence of God and the immortality of the soul are demonstrated) is a philosophical treatise by René Descartes first published in 1641 (in Lat...
The World (Descartes)
The World, also called Treatise on the Light (French title: Traité du monde et de la lumière), is a book by René Descartes (1596–1650). Written between 1629 and 1633, it contains a nearly comple...
Dystheism
Dystheism (from Greek δυσ- dys-, "bad" and θεός theos, "god"), is the belief that a god, goddess, or singular God is not wholly good as is commonly understood (such as the monotheistic religions of Ch...
Orientation (mathematics)
In mathematics, orientation is a geometric notion that in two dimensions allows one to say when a cycle goes around clockwise or counterclockwise, and in three dimensions when a figure is left-handed ...
Cartesian dualism
In philosophy of mind, dualism is the position that mental phenomena are, in some respects, non-physical, or that the mind and body are not identical. Thus, it encompasses a set of views about the rel...
Edmund Husserl
Edmund Gustav Albrecht Husserl (/ˈhʊsɛrl/; [ˈhʊsɐl]; April 8, 1859 – April 27, 1938) was a German philosopher who established the school of phenomenology. He broke with the positivist orientation of t...
Cartesianism
Cartesianism is the name given to the philosophical doctrine (or school) of René Descartes. Descartes is often regarded as the first thinker to emphasize the use of reason to develop the natural scien...
Balthasar Bekker
Balthasar Bekker (20 March 1634 – 11 June 1698) was a Dutch minister and author of philosophical and theological works. Opposing superstition, he was a key figure in the end of the witchcraft persecut...
La Géométrie
La Géométrie was published in 1637 as an appendix to Discours de la méthode (Discourse on Method), written by René Descartes. In the Discourse, he presents his method for obtaining clarity on any subj...
Francine Descartes
Francine Descartes (19 July 1635, Deventer – 7 September 1640, Amersfoort) was René Descartes' daughter.Francine was the daughter of Helena Jans van der Strom, a domestic servant of Thomas Sergeant — ...
Cartesian Self
In philosophy, the Cartesian Self is the counterpart to the Cartesian Other. According to Descartes, there is a divide intrinsic to human consciousness, such that one cannot ever bridge the space betw...
Octant
Octant may refer to:
Cartesian doubt
Cartesian doubt is a form of methodological skepticism associated with the writings and methodology of René Descartes. Cartesian doubt is also known as Cartesian skepticism, methodic doubt, methodolog...
Right-hand rule
In mathematics and physics, the right-hand rule is a common mnemonic for understanding notation conventions for vectors in 3 dimensions. There are several right hand rules that make it easy to underst...
Dream argument
The dream argument is the postulation that the act of dreaming provides preliminary evidence that the senses we trust to distinguish reality from illusion should not be fully trusted, and therefore an...