Regulatory economics
Regulatory economics is the economics of regulation, in the sense of the application of law by government or an independent agency for various purposes, such as centrally-planning an economy, remedyin...
Home builder confidence soared to highest level in 12 years as Trump rolls back regulations
The nation's home builders couldn't be happier with President Donald Trump's first move to remove strict environmental rules.
Bayer-Monsanto Merger Is 'Five-Alarm Threat' To Food And Farms: Legal Experts
A new legal opinion penned by two former Justice Department officials bolsters warnings that the proposed merger between agroindustrial giants Bayer and Monsanto "is a five-alarm threat to our food su...
The Problem With Profits | Big Firms In The United States Have Never Had It So Good. Time For More Competition.
AMERICA used to be the land of opportunity and optimism. Now opportunity is seen as the preserve of the elite: two-thirds of Americans believe the economy is rigged in favour of vested interests. And ...
Anti-competitive practices
Anti-competitive practices are business, government or religious practices that prevent or reduce competition in a market (see restraint of trade).These can include:Also criticized are:
It is usua...
Competition law
Competition law is a law that promotes or seeks to maintain market competition by regulating anti-competitive conduct by companies. Competition law is implemented through public and private enforcemen...
Competition law - Wikipedia
Regulatory compliance
In general, compliance means conforming to a rule, such as a specification, policy, standard or law. Regulatory compliance describes the goal that organisations aspire to achieve in their efforts to e...
Regulation through litigation
Regulation through litigation refers to changes in society (particularly those that affect industries) brought about by litigation, rather than legislation or regulation.Some critics of regulation thr...
Collusion
Collusion is an agreement between two or more parties, sometimes illegal and therefore secretive, to limit open competition by deceiving, misleading, or defrauding others of their legal rights, or to ...
Bayer-Monsanto Merger Is 'Five-Alarm Threat' To Food And Farms: Legal Experts
A new legal opinion penned by two former Justice Department officials bolsters warnings that the proposed merger between agroindustrial giants Bayer and Monsanto "is a five-alarm threat to our food su...
Restrictive Practices Court
The Restrictive Practices Court was a senior court of record in the United Kingdom. It was created in 1956 to foster competition through enforcement of the Restrictive Trade Practices Act 1956. Though...
Legal Services Board
The Legal Services Board (LSB) is the independent body responsible for overseeing the regulation of lawyers in England and Wales. It is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Ministry of Just...
Deregulation and Contracting Out Act 1994
The Deregulation and Contracting Out Act 1994 (c. 40) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It introduced wide ranging measures aiming to cut government expenditure and bureaucracy. An ex...
Regulatory Barriers Clearinghouse
The Regulatory Barriers Clearinghouse (RBC) collects, processes, assembles, and disseminates information on existing barriers that inhibit the production and conservation of affordable housing. RBC is...
Regulatory Barriers Clearinghouse - Wikipedia
Monopsony
In economics, a monopsony (from Ancient Greek μόνος (mónos) "single" + ὀψωνία (opsōnía) "purchase") is a market form in which only one buyer interfaces with would-be sellers of a particular product.Th...
Monopsony - Wikipedia
Regulatory risk differentiation
Regulatory risk differentiation the process used by a regulatory authority (the regulator) to systemically treat entities differently based on the regulator's assessment of the risks of the entity's ...
Regulatory risk differentiation - Wikipedia
Averch–Johnson effect
The Averch–Johnson effect is the tendency of regulated companies to engage in excessive amounts of capital accumulation in order to expand the volume of their profits. If companies' profits to capital...
Coase conjecture
The Coase conjecture, developed first by Ronald Coase, is an argument in monopoly theory. The conjecture sets up a situation in which a monopolist sells a durable good to a market where resale is imp...
Corporatization
Corporatization is the process of transforming state assets, government agencies, or municipal organizations into corporations. It refers to a restructuring of government and public organizations into...
Price-cap regulation
Price-cap regulation is a form of regulation designed in the 1980s by UK Treasury economist Stephen Littlechild, which has been applied to all of the privatized British network utilities. It is contra...
Water privatization
Water privatization is used here as a shorthand for private sector participation in the provision of water services and sanitation (the sale of water resources themselves is covered in the article on ...
Water privatization - Wikipedia
Monopoly
A monopoly (from Greek monos μόνος (alone or single) + polein πωλεῖν (to sell)) exists when a specific person or enterprise is the only supplier of a particular commodity (this contrasts with a mono...
Monopoly - Wikipedia
Williamson trade-off model
The Williamson trade-off model is a theoretical model in the economics of industrial organization which emphasizes the trade-off associated with horizontal mergers between gains resulting from lower c...
Williamson trade-off model - Wikipedia
Private security company
A private security company is a for-profit enterprise, sometimes a corporation or a limited liability partnership, which provides armed and unarmed security services and expertise to private and publi...
Pension regulation
Pension regulation is a legal term encompassing the set of laws, rules and authoritative standards governing the pension industry, and the procedures needed to enforce them. Pension regulation varies ...
Command and control regulation
‘Command and Control’ (CAC) regulation finds common usage in academic literature and beyond. The relationship between CAC and environmental policy is considered in this article, an area that demonstra...
Revenue-cap regulation
Revenue-cap regulation is a system for setting the prices charged by regulated monopolies by limiting the total revenue in a given period. It is contrasted with rate-of-return regulation, in which uti...
Liberalization
In general, liberalization (or liberalisation) refers to a relaxation of previous government restrictions, usually in such areas of social, political and economic policy. In some contexts this proces...
Utility ratemaking
Utility ratemaking is the formal regulatory process by which public utilities set the prices (more commonly known as "rates") they will charge consumers. Ratemaking, typically carried out through "rat...
Utility ratemaking - Wikipedia