Pythagoreanism
Pythagoreanism was the system of esoteric and metaphysical beliefs held by Pythagoras and his followers, the Pythagoreans, who were considerably influenced by mathematics, music and astronomy. Pythago...
Pythagoreanism - Wikipedia
Pythagoras - Life - video
a short film about the life and achievements of the greek mathematician pythagoras.
Iamblichus of Chalcis
Iamblichus, also known as Iamblichus Chalcidensis, or Iamblichus of Apamea (Greek: Ἰάμβλιχος, probably from Syriac or Aramaic ya-mlku, "He is king"; c. 245 – c. 325 AD), was a Syrian Neoplatonist phil...
Neopythagoreanism
Neopythagoreanism (or Neo-Pythagoreanism) was a school of Hellenistic philosophy which revived Pythagorean doctrines.Neopythagoreanism was influenced by Middle Platonism and in turn influenced Neoplat...
Neopythagoreanism - Wikipedia
Jaysh al-Muwahhideen
The Jaysh al-Muwahhideen or Jaysh Abu Ibrahim (Arabic: جيش الموحدين‎) is a Druze militant group in Syria. Their name means "Army of Monotheists" or "Army of Unitarians". The group mainly ope...
Jaysh al-Muwahhideen - Wikipedia
Bolus of Mendes
Bolus of Mendes (Greek: Βῶλος Bolos; fl. 3rd century BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, a neo-Pythagorean writer of works of esoterica and medical works, who worked in Ptolemaic Egypt. The Suda, an...
Sentences of Sextus
The Sentences of Sextus is a Hellenistic Pythagorean text, modified to reflect a Christian viewpoint which was popular among Christians. The earliest mention of the Sentences is in the mid 3rd century...
Pentagram
A pentagram (sometimes known as a pentalpha or pentangle or a star pentagon) is the shape of a five-pointed star drawn with five straight strokes.The word pentagram comes from the Greek word πεντάγραμ...
Pentagram - Wikipedia
Eurytus (Pythagorean)
Eurytus (/ˈjʊərɨtəs/; Greek: Εὔρυτος; fl. 400 BC), was an eminent Pythagorean philosopher who Iamblichus in one passage describes as a native of Croton, while in another, he enumerates him among the T...
Pythagoras
Pythagoras of Samos (/pɪˈθæɡərəs/; /paɪˈθæɡərəs/; Greek: Πυθαγόρας ὁ Σάμιος Pythagóras ho Sámios "Pythagoras the Samian", or simply Πυθαγόρας; Πυθαγόρης in Ionian Greek; c. 570 – c. 495 BC) ...
Pythagoras - Wikipedia
Brontinus
Brontinus (Greek: Βροντῖνος; fl. 6th century BCE), or Brotinus of Metapontum, was a Pythagorean philosopher, and a friend and disciple of Pythagoras himself. Alcmaeon dedicated his works to Bront...
Xenophilus
Xenophilus (Greek: Ξενόφιλος; 4th century BC) of Chalcidice, was a Pythagorean philosopher and musician, who lived in the first half of the 4th century BC. Aulus Gellius relates that Xenophilus wa...
Xenophilus - Wikipedia
Democrates
Democrates (/dɪˈmɒkrəˌtiːz/; Greek: Δημοκράτης) was a Pythagorean philosopher about whom little is known. A collection of moral maxims, called the Golden Sentences (Greek: γνῶμαι χρυσαῖ) has c...
Democrates - Wikipedia
Phintys
Phintys (or Phyntis, Greek: Φίντυς; 4th or 3rd century BC) was a Pythagorean philosopher. Nothing is known about her life, nor where she came from. She wrote a work on the correct behaviour of wom...
Acrion
Acrion was a Locrian and a Pythagorean philosopher. He is mentioned by Valerius Maximus under the name of Arion. According to William Smith, Arion is a false reading, instead of Acrion.
Tetrad (Greek philosophy)
The tetrad was the name given to the number four in Pythagorean philosophy. There were four seasons and four elements, and the number was also associated with planetary motions and music.
Druze
The Druze (/druːz/; Arabic: درزي‎ derzī or durzī, plural دروز durūz; Hebrew: דרוזים‎, druzim) are a monotheistic religious and social community found primarily in Syria, Lebanon, Israe...
Druze - Wikipedia
Jumblatt family
The Jumblatt family (جنبلاط in Arabic, originally Kurdish Janpoulad (جان‌پولاد, meaning "steel-bodied" or "soul of steel"), also transliterated as Joumblatt, Junblat and Junblatt) is an influential Dr...
Jumblatt family - Wikipedia
Apollonius of Tyana
Apollonius of Tyana (Ancient Greek: Ἀπολλώνιος ὁ Τυανεύς; c. 15 – c. 100 CE) was a Greek Neopythagorean philosopher from the town of Tyana in the Roman province of Cappadocia in Asia Minor. Littl...
Apollonius of Tyana - Wikipedia
Table of Opposites
The Table of Opposites of Pythagoras is the oldest surviving of many such tables propounded by philosophers. Aristotle is the main source of our knowledge of the Pythagorean table. Here follows a ro...
The golden verses of Pythagoras
The Golden Verses of Pythagoras (Greek: Χρύσεα Ἔπη, Chrysea Epê; Latin: Aurea Carmina) are a collection of moral exhortations. They comprise 71 lines written in dactylic hexameter verse and are tr...
Damon and Pythias
In Greek historiography, Damon and Pythias (or Phintias) is a legend surrounding the Pythagorean ideal of friendship. Pythias is accused and charged of creating a plot against the tyrannical Dionysiu...
Pythagorean hammers
According to legend, Pythagoras discovered the foundations of musical tuning by listening to the sounds of four blacksmith's hammers, which produced consonance and dissonance when they were struck sim...
Pythagorean hammers - Wikipedia
Druze power struggle (1658–67)
The Druze power struggle of 1658-1667 was one of the most violent episodes of tribal disputes during Ottoman rule in the Levant. The conflict erupted between rebel and pro-Ottoman Druze factions over ...
Divine call
The Divine call, Unitarian call, or Da‘wat at-tawḥīd is the Druze period of time that was opened at sunset on Thursday 30 May 1017 CE by Fātimid Caliph Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah and closed in 1043 CE by ...
Timaeus of Locri
Timaeus of Locri (/taɪˈmiːəs/; Greek: Τίμαιος ὁ Λοκρός; Latin: Timaeus Locrus) was a Greek Pythagorean philosopher living ca. 420–380 BCE. He features in Plato's Timaeus, where he is said to c...
Anaxilaus
Anaxilaus of Larissa (1st-century BC) was a physician and Pythagorean philosopher. According to Eusebius, he was banished from Rome in 28 BC by Augustus on the charge of practicing magic. Anaxilaus wr...
Anaxilaus - Wikipedia