Public choice theory
Public choice or public choice theory refers to "the use of economic tools to deal with traditional problems of political science". Its content includes the study of political behavior. In political s...
Home builder confidence soared to highest level in 12 years as Trump rolls back regulations
The nation's home builders couldn't be happier with President Donald Trump's first move to remove strict environmental rules.
How The Owners Of Fidelity Get Richer At Everyday Investors' Expense
At Fidelity, ordinary fund investors are missing out on hot pre-IPO deals due to conflicts of interest with the funds’ billionaire owners.
Advocacy group
Advocacy groups (also known as pressure groups, lobby groups, campaign groups, interest groups, or special interest groups) use various forms of advocacy to influence public opinion and/or policy; the...
Conflict of interest
A conflict of interest (COI) is a situation in which a person or organization is involved in multiple interests (financial, emotional, or otherwise), one of which could possibly corrupt the motivation...
Public–private partnership
A public–private partnership (PPP) is a government service or private business venture which is funded and operated through a partnership of government and one or more private sector companies. These ...
Home builder confidence soared to highest level in 12 years as Trump rolls back regulations
The nation's home builders couldn't be happier with President Donald Trump's first move to remove strict environmental rules.
Self-policing
Self-policing, a form of self-regulation, is the process whereby an organization is asked, or volunteers, to monitor its own adherence to legal, ethical, or safety standards, rather than have an outsi...
How The Owners Of Fidelity Get Richer At Everyday Investors' Expense
At Fidelity, ordinary fund investors are missing out on hot pre-IPO deals due to conflicts of interest with the funds’ billionaire owners.
Virginia school of political economy
The Virginia school of political economy is the school of economic thought originating in universities of Virginia and mainly focusing on public choice theory, constitutional economics, and law and ec...
Forced rider
A forced rider in economics is a person who is required, by government or other collective, to share in the costs of goods or services without benefiting from them. Such goods are typically non-exclud...
Crony capitalism
Crony capitalism is a term describing an economy in which success in business depends on close relationships between business people and government officials. It may be exhibited by favoritism in the ...
Regulatory economics
Regulatory economics is the economics of regulation, in the sense of the application of law by government or an independent agency for various purposes, such as centrally-planning an economy, remedyin...
Collective action
Collective action is traditionally defined as any action taken together by a group of people whose goal is to enhance their status and achieve a common objective. It is enacted by a representative of...
Spin (public relations)
In public relations, spin is a form of propaganda, achieved through providing an interpretation of an event or campaign to persuade public opinion in favor or against some organization or public figur...
Rent-seeking
In economics and public choice theory, rent-seeking is seeking to increase one's share of existing wealth without creating new wealth. The effects of rent-seeking are reduced economic efficiency throu...
Deregulation and Contracting Out Act 1994
The Deregulation and Contracting Out Act 1994 (c. 40) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It introduced wide ranging measures aiming to cut government expenditure and bureaucracy. An ex...
Roland McKean
Roland N. McKean (October 30, 1917 in Mulberry Grove, Illinois – April 15, 1993 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina) is an American economist. He received his A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in economics fr...
The Logic of Collective Action
The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the Theory of Groups is a book by Mancur Olson, Jr. published in 1965. It develops a theory of political science and economics of concentrated benefits...
Club good
Club goods (also artificially scarce goods) are a type of good in economics, sometimes classified as a subtype of public goods that are excludable but non-rivalrous, at least until reaching a point wh...
Averch–Johnson effect
The Averch–Johnson effect is the tendency of regulated companies to engage in excessive amounts of capital accumulation in order to expand the volume of their profits. If companies' profits to capital...
Public Private Partnership in India
A public–private partnership (PPP) is a government service or private business venture which is funded and operated through a partnership of government and one or more private sector companies. These ...
E. G. West
Edwin George West (27 February 1922 - 6 October 2001) was an economist and economic historian at Carleton University interested in the relationship between the state and the education sector. He appli...
Randall G. Holcombe
Randall Gregory Holcombe (born June 4, 1950) is an American economist, and the DeVoe Moore Professor of Economics at Florida State University. He is a Research Fellow at The Independent Institute, a S...
Median voter theorem
The median voter theorem states that "a majority rule voting system will select the outcome most preferred by the median voter". The median voter theorem makes two key assumptions. First, the theorem ...
Bruce Yandle
Bruce Yandle (born August 12, 1933) is Dean Emeritus of Clemson University's College of Business and Behavioral Science and Alumni Distinguished Professor of Economics Emeritus at Clemson. He is a Dis...
Robert Tollison
Robert D. Tollison (born 1942) is an American economist who specializes in public choice theory.
A native of Spartanburg, South Carolina, Tollison attended local Wofford College where he earned an...