Normative ethics
Normative ethics is the study of ethical action. It is the branch of philosophical ethics that investigates the set of questions that arise when considering how one ought to act, morally speaking. Nor...
Deontological ethics
Deontological ethics or deontology is the normative ethical position that judges the morality of an action based on the action's adherence to a rule or rules. It is sometimes described as "duty-" or "...
Utilitarianism
Utilitarianism is a theory in normative ethics holding that the moral action is the one that maximizes utility. Utility is defined in various ways, including as pleasure, economic well-being and the l...
Virtue ethics
Virtue ethics (or aretaic ethics /ˌærəˈteɪɪk/ from the Greek arete) emphasizes the role of one's character and the virtues that one's character embodies for determining or evaluating ethical behavior....
The Theory of Good and Evil
The Theory of Good and Evil is a 1907 book by the English philosopher Hastings Rashdall.
Rashdall argues that actions are right or wrong according to whether they produce well-being, which he defi...
Kantianism
Kantianism is the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, a German philosopher born in Königsberg, Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia). The term "Kantianism" or "Kantian" is sometimes also used to describe contemp...
Robert Nozick
Robert Nozick (/ˈnoʊzɪk/; November 16, 1938 – January 23, 2002) was an American philosopher who was most prominent in the 1970s and 1980s. He was a professor at Harvard University. He is best kno...
Moral absolutism
Moral absolutism is an ethical view that particular actions are intrinsically right or wrong. Stealing, for instance, might be considered to be always immoral, even if done for the well-being of other...
Celibacy
Celibacy (from Latin, cælibatus") is voluntarily being unmarried, sexually abstinent, or both, usually for religious reasons. It is often in association with the role of a religious official or devote...
Natural-rights libertarianism
Natural-rights libertarianism, also known as deontological libertarianism, philosophical libertarianism, deontological liberalism, rights-theorist libertarianism, natural rights-based libertarianism, ...
Feminist Approaches to Bioethics
Feminist Approaches to Bioethics (International Network on Feminist Approaches to Bioethics), or FAB, is a network of feminists in bioethics, adding feminist perspectives to ethical issues in health c...
On the Basis of Morality
On the Basis of Morality (German: Über die Grundlage der Moral, 1840) is one of Arthur Schopenhauer's major works in ethics, in which he argues that morality stems from compassion. Schopenhauer be...
Wlodek Rabinowicz
Wlodek Rabinowicz (Włodzimierz Rabinowicz, born on January 14, 1947 in Warsaw) is a philosopher elaborating ethics, normativity, decision theory and utilitarianism. At present he is working as profess...
Feminist ethics
Feminist ethics is an approach to ethics that builds on the belief that traditionally ethical theorising has under-valued and/or under-appreciated women's moral experience and it therefore chooses to ...
Egoism
The terms "egoism" and "egotism" may refer to:
Role ethics
Role ethics is an ethical theory based on family roles. Unlike virtue ethics, role ethics is not individualistic. Morality is derived from a person's relationship with their community. The ethics of C...
Aristotelian ethics
Aristotle first used the term "ethics" to name a field of study developed by his predecessors Socrates and Plato. Philosophical ethics is the attempt to offer a rational response to the question of ho...
Cārvāka
Cārvāka (Sanskrit: चार्वाक), originally known as Lokāyata and Bṛhaspatya, is one of the heterodox schools of Hinduism, that rejects supernaturalism, emphasizes materialism and philosophical scepti...
Altruism
Altruism or selflessness is the principle or practice of concern for the welfare of others. It is a traditional virtue in many cultures and a core aspect of various religious traditions and secular wo...
Bite the bullet
To "bite the bullet" is to endure a painful or otherwise unpleasant situation that is seen as unavoidable. The phrase was first recorded by Rudyard Kipling in his 1891 novel The Light that Failed.It i...
Appeal to consequences
Appeal to consequences, also known as argumentum ad consequentiam (Latin for "argument to the consequences"), is an argument that concludes a hypothesis (typically a belief) to be either true or false...
Mental reservation
The doctrine of mental reservation, or of mental equivocation, was a special branch of casuistry (case-based reasoning) developed in the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance, and most often associated...
Categorical imperative
The categorical imperative (German: kategorischer Imperativ) is the central philosophical concept in the deontological moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant. Introduced in Kant's 1785 Grounding for t...
Critique of Practical Reason
The Critique of Practical Reason (German: Kritik der praktischen Vernunft, KpV) is the second of Immanuel Kant's three critiques, first published in 1788. It follows on from Kant's Critique of Pu...
Gualdrada
Gualdrada was a member of the nobility in 13th century Florence, Italy. She was a daughter of Bellincion Berti, being a descendent of the Ravignani family, a branch of the Adimari family.
Giova...