Nicene Creed
The Nicene Creed (Greek: Σύμβολον τῆς Νίκαιας, Latin: Symbolum Nicaenum) is a profession of faith widely used in Christian liturgy.It is called Nicene /ˈnaɪsiːn/ because originally adopted in the cit...
First Council of Nicaea
The First Council of Nicaea (/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈni:kaɪja]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Nicaea in Bithynia by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325. This first ecum...
Filioque
Filioque ([filiˈɔkwe]), Latin for "and (from) the Son", is a phrase included in some forms of the Nicene Creed though not all, and which has been the subject of great controversy between Eastern and W...
Perichoresis
Perichoresis (from Greek: περιχώρησις perikhōrēsis, "rotation") describes the relationship between each person of the triune God (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). The word circumincession (later cir...
Primacy of the Roman Pontiff
The primacy of the Bishop of Rome is an ecclesiastical doctrine concerning the respect and authority that is due to the Bishop of Rome from other bishops and their sees. Together with the Filioque c...
Development of the Christian biblical canon
The Christian biblical canons are the books Christians regard as divinely inspired and constituting a Christian Bible. Books included in the Christian biblical canons of both the Old and New Testament...
Arius
Arius (Ancient Greek: Ἄρειος, AD 250 or 256–336) was an ascetic Christian presbyter of Libyan birth, possibly of Berber extraction, and priest in Alexandria, Egypt, of the church of the Baucalis....
History of the Filioque controversy
There are two separate issues in the Filioque controversy of Christianity, the orthodoxy of the doctrine itself and the liceity of the interpolation of the phrase into the Nicene Creed. Although the d...
Arianism
Arianism is the nontrinitarian, heterodoxical teaching, first attributed to Arius (c. AD 250–336), a Christian presbyter in Alexandria, Egypt, concerning the relationship of God the Father to the Son ...
East-West Schism
The East–West Schism is the break of communion between what are now the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches which began in the 11th century.There had long been ecclesiastical differences and ...
Constantine I and Christianity
While the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (reigned 306–337) ruled, Christianity began to transition to the dominant religion of the Roman Empire. Historians remain uncertain about Constantine's re...
Arian controversy
The Arian controversy describes several controversies between the priest and theologian Arius and the Church Father, Bishop Athanasius related to Christology which divided the Catholic Church from bef...
Eastern Orthodox teaching regarding the Filioque
William La Due describes modern Orthodox theological scholarship as split between a group of scholars that hold to a "strict traditionalism going back to Photius" and other scholars that are "not so a...
Photios I of Constantinople
Photios I (Greek: Φώτιος Phōtios; c. 810 – c. 893), also spelled Photius (/ˈfoʊʃəs/) or Fotios, was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 858 to 867 and from 877 to 886; He is recognized...
Meletius of Lycopolis
Meletius (died after 325) was bishop of Lycopolis in Egypt. He is known mainly as the founder and namesake of the Meletians (c. 305), one of several schismatic sects in early church history which were...