Metre (poetry)
In poetry, metre (meter in American spelling) is the basic rhythmic structure of a verse or lines in verse. Many traditional verse forms prescribe a specific verse metre, or a certain set of metres ...
Foot (prosody)
The foot is the basic metrical unit that forms part of a line of verse in most Western traditions of poetry, including English accentual-syllabic verse and the quantitative meter of classical ancient ...
Catalectic
A catalectic line is a metrically incomplete line of verse, lacking a syllable at the end or ending with an incomplete foot. One form of catalexis is headlessness, where the unstressed syllable is dro...
Catalectic - Wikipedia
Vedic accent
The pitch accent of Vedic Sanskrit, or Vedic accent for brevity, is traditionally divided by Sanskrit grammarians into three qualities, udātta "raised" (acute accent, high pitch), anudātta "not raise...
Glyconic
Glyconic, (from Glycon, a Greek lyric poet), describes a form of meter in classical Greek and Latin poetry. The glyconic line is the most basic form of Aeolic verse, and it is often combined with othe...
Diaeresis (prosody)
In poetic meter, diaeresis (/daɪˈɛrɨsɪs/ or /daɪˈɪərɨsɪs/, also spelled diæresis or dieresis) has two meanings: the separate pronunciation of the two vowels in a diphthong for the sake of meter, and a...
Diaeresis (prosody) - Wikipedia
List of classical meters
The following meters were used in Greek poetry and adapted for Latin poetry:
Fourteener (poetry)
A Fourteener, in poetry, is a line consisting of 14 syllables, which are usually made of 7 iambic feet for which the style is also called iambic heptameter. It is most commonly found in English poetry...
Fourteener (poetry) - Wikipedia
Knittelvers
Knittelvers or Knittel, is a kind of Germanic verse meter which originated in Germany during the Middle Ages. It requires rhymes or assonances. One can distinguish between strict knittel with eight or...
Knittelvers - Wikipedia
Line break (poetry)
A line break in poetry is the termination of the line of a poem, and the beginning of a new line; within the standard conventions of Western literature, this is usually but not always at the left marg...
Beit
A Beit (also spelled bait, Arabic: بيت‎  [beːt, bi(ː)t, bajt], literally "a house") is a metrical unit of Arabic, Iranian, Urdu and Sindhi poetry. It corresponds to a line, though somet...
Acatalexis
An acatalectic line of verse is one having the metrically complete number of syllables in the final foot. When talking about poetry written in English the term is arguably of limited significance or ...
Neo-Miltonic syllabics
Neo-Miltonic Syllabics is a meter devised by Robert Bridges. It was first employed by the poet in a group of poems composed between 1921 and 1925, and collected in his book New Verse (1925). In "Kate'...
Dactylic hexameter
Dactylic hexameter (also known as "heroic hexameter") is a form of meter in poetry or a rhythmic scheme. It is traditionally associated with the quantitative meter of classical epic poetry in both Gre...
Tetrameter
In poetry, a tetrameter is a line of four metrical feet. The particular foot can vary, as follows:
Antibacchius
An antibacchius is a rare metrical foot used in formal poetry. In accentual-syllabic verse an antibacchius consists of two accented syllables followed by one unaccented syllable. Its opposite is a ba...
Ionic meter
The ionic is a four-syllable metrical unit (metron) of light-light-heavy-heavy ( — —) that occurs in ancient Greek and Latin poetry. Like the choriamb, in classical quantitative verse the ionic never ...
Double amphibrach
The double amphibrach is a variation of the double dactyl, similar to the McWhirtle but with stricter formal requirements. Meter and lineation are consistently amphibrachic (da DA da) rather than dac...
Robert Bridges' theory of elision
Robert Bridges' theory of elision is a theory of elision developed by the poet Robert Bridges, while he was working on a prosodic analysis of John Milton's poems Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and ...
Hexameter
Hexameter is a metrical line of verses consisting of six feet. It was the standard epic metre in classical Greek and Latin literature, such as in the Iliad, Odyssey and Aeneid. Its use in other genres...
Ezra Pound's Three Kinds of Poetry
Ezra Pound distinguished three "kinds of poetry:" melopoeia, phanopoeia, and logopoeia.
Melopoeia or melopeia is when words are "charged" beyond their normal meaning with some musical property whi...
Biceps (prosody)
Biceps is a point in a metrical pattern that can be filled either with one long syllable (a longum) or two short syllables (brevia). It is found in the dactylic hexameter and the dactylic pentameter.I...
Traditional Welsh poetic metres
The traditional Welsh poetic meters consist of twenty four different types of poetic meter, called Y Pedwar Mesur ar Hugain in Welsh. They are all written in cynghanedd of varying degrees of complexit...
Anceps
In Greek and Latin meter, an anceps syllable is a syllable in a metrical line which can be either short or long. An anceps syllable may be called "free" or "irrational" depending on the type of meter...
Archilochian
Archilochian or archilochean is a term used in the metrical analysis of Ancient Greek and Latin poetry. The name is derived from Archilochus, whose poetry first uses the rhythms.
In the analysis ...
Breve
A breve (/briːv/, less often /brɛv/; [bʁɛv]; from the Latin brevis “short, brief”) is the diacritic mark ˘, shaped like the bottom half of a circle. As used in Ancient Greek, it is also called v...
Breve - Wikipedia
Milton's Prosody (book)
Milton's Prosody, or in full, Milton's Prosody, with a chapter on Accentual Verse and Notes is a book by Robert Bridges. It was first published by Oxford University Press in 1889, and a final revised ...
Ganesha pancharathnam
Sri Maha Ganesha Pancharatnam was composed by Sri Adi Sankara Baghvad Pada in the 8th Century. It is a famous sloka addressing Lord Ganesha or Lord Ganapati who is the destroyer of obstacles. As the n...
Bridges' analysis of Paradise Lost
In his book Milton's Prosody, Robert Bridges undertakes a detailed analysis of the prosody of John Milton's Paradise Lost. Bridges shows that there are no lines in Paradise Lost with fewer than ten s...