Maya ceramics
Maya ceramics are ceramics produced in the Pre-Columbian Maya culture of Mesoamerica. Through the years, the vessels took on different shapes, colors, sizes, and purposes. The intense artistic mosaics...
Maya ceramics - Wikipedia
Olmec figurine
This article on the Olmec figurine describes a number of archetypical figurines produced by the Formative Period inhabitants of Mesoamerica. While many of these figurines may or may not have been pro...
Olmec figurine - Wikipedia
Double-headed serpent
The Double-headed serpent is an Aztec sculpture kept at the British Museum. Composed of mostly turquoise pieces applied to a wood base, it is one of nine mosaics of similar material in the British Mus...
Double-headed serpent - Wikipedia
Stone of Motecuhzoma I
The Stone of Motecuhzoma I is a large carved Aztec stone that was found in 1988 under the patio of the Edificio del Ex-Arzobispado in the Distrito Federal of Mexico. It is also known as the Stone of M...
Stone of Motecuhzoma I - Wikipedia
Stone of Tizoc
The Stone of Tizoc, Tizoc Stone or Sacrificial Stone is a large, round, carved Aztec stone, rediscovered on 17 December 1791. It is thought to have been a quauhxicalli, in which the hearts of victims ...
Stone of Tizoc - Wikipedia
Teocalli of the Sacred War
The Teocalli of the Sacred War (teocalli is Nahuatl for "temple"; Spanish: El Teocalli de la Guerra Sagrada) is the name given by archaeologist Alfonso Caso to a monolithic pre-Columbian miniature of ...
Teocalli of the Sacred War - Wikipedia
Prismatic blade
In archaeology, a prismatic blade is a long, narrow, specialized lithic flake with parallel margins. Prismatic blades are removed from polyhedral blade cores through pressure reduction. This process...
Prismatic blade - Wikipedia
Coyolxauhqui Stone
The Coyolxauhqui Stone is a carved, circular Aztec stone, depicting the mythical being Coyolxauhqui dismembered and decapitated. It was rediscovered in 1978 at the site of the Templo Mayor of Tenochti...
Coyolxauhqui Stone - Wikipedia
Mirrors in Mesoamerican culture
The use of mirrors in Mesoamerican culture was associated with the idea that they served as portals to a realm that could be seen but not interacted with. Mirrors in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica were fas...
Mirrors in Mesoamerican culture - Wikipedia
Molcajete
A molcajete (mo̞lkaˈxe̞te̞ or mol-cah-hay’-tay; Mexican Spanish, from Nahuatl mulcazitl) is a stone tool, the traditional Mexican version of the mortar and pestle, similar to the South American batan,...
Molcajete - Wikipedia
Obsidian use in Mesoamerica
Obsidian is a naturally formed volcanic glass that was an important part of the material culture of Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. Obsidian was a highly integrated part of daily and ritual life, and its ...
Obsidian use in Mesoamerica - Wikipedia
Puerto Marques
Puerto Marques is the home of the oldest known pottery found in Mesoamerica, a culture area within the borders of Central America. It is located in the Mexican state of Guerrero, on the Pacific coast...
Dedication Stone
The Dedication Stone is a carved Aztec artifact of polished greenstone. It is believed to commemorate the completion of the Templo Mayor of Tenochtitlan in 1487, and may have been set into one of the ...
Dedication Stone - Wikipedia
Ancient Mexico
Ancient Mexico was an exhibition by William Bullock of casts of Aztec artifacts and both copies and originals of Aztec codices, held in 1824 in the Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly, London. Objects exhibit...
Cuauhxicalli
A cuauhxicalli or quauhxicalli (/kʷaːʍʃiˈkalːi/, meaning "Eagle gourd bowl") was an altar-like stone vessel used by the Aztecs to contain human hearts extracted in sacrificial ceremonies. A cuahxicall...
Cuauhxicalli - Wikipedia
Yaxchilan Lintel 24
Lintel 24 is the designation given by modern archaeologists to an ancient Maya limestone carving from Yaxchilan, in modern Chiapas, Mexico. The lintel dates to about AD 725, placing it within the Maya...
Yaxchilan Lintel 24 - Wikipedia
Laguna de los Cerros
Laguna de los Cerros is a little-excavated Olmec and Classical era archaeological site, located in the vicinity of Corral Nuevo, within the municipality of Acayucan, in the Mexican state of Veracruz, ...
Mano (stone)
A mano (English: hand) is a ground stone tool used with a metate to process or grind food by hand.
Manos were used in prehistoric times to process wild seeds, nuts and other food, generally used w...
Mano (stone) - Wikipedia
Jade use in Mesoamerica
Some view Jade use in Mesoamerica as largely influenced by the conceptualization of the material as a rare and valued commodity among pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures, such as the Olmec, the Maya,...
Jade use in Mesoamerica - Wikipedia
Eccentric flint (archaeology)
An eccentric flint is an elite chipped artifact of an often irregular ('eccentric') shape produced by the Classic Maya civilization of ancient Mesoamerica. Although generally referred to as "flints", ...
Eccentric flint (archaeology) - Wikipedia
Copán Altar Q
Altar Q is the designation given to one of the most notable of the rectangular sculpted stone blocks (dubbed "altars") recovered at the Mesoamerican archaeological site of Copán, present-day Honduras....
Copán Altar Q - Wikipedia
Huamango
Huamango is an early Postclassical (Toltec period) archaeological located about 4 kilometers northwest of the modern city of Acambay in the State of Mexico. The archaeological area is on the San Migue...
Huamango - Wikipedia
Tuxtla Statuette
The Tuxtla Statuette is a small 6.3 inch (16 cm) rounded greenstone figurine, carved to resemble a squat, bullet-shaped human with a duck-like bill and wings. Most researchers believe the s...
Tuxtla Statuette - Wikipedia
Metate
A metate (or mealing stone) is a mortar, a ground stone tool used for processing grain and seeds. In traditional Mesoamerican culture, metates were typically used by women who would grind calcified ma...
Metate - Wikipedia
Aztec calendar stone
The Aztec calendar stone, Sun Stone, or Stone of the Five Eras is a late post-classic Mexica sculpture saved in the National Anthropology Museum in Mexico City, and is perhaps the most famous work of ...
Aztec calendar stone - Wikipedia
Tres Zapotes Monument A
Tres Zapotes is a Mesoamerican archaeological site located in the south-central Gulf Lowlands of Mexico in the Papaloapan River plain. Tres Zapotes is sometimes referred to as the third major Olmec ca...
Tres Zapotes Monument A - Wikipedia
Plug (jewellery)
A plug (sometimes earplug or earspool), in the context of body modification, is a short, cylindrical piece of jewellery commonly worn in larger-gauge body piercings. Because of their size — which is o...
Plug (jewellery) - Wikipedia
Grinding slab
In archaeology, a grinding slab is a ground stone artifact generally used to grind plant materials into usable size, though some slabs were used to shape other ground stone artifacts. Some grinding ...
Grinding slab - Wikipedia
Coatlicue statue
The Coatlicue statue is a 2.7 metre (8.9 ft) tall andesite statue usually identified with the Aztec goddess Coatlicue ("snakes-her-skirt"). It is currently located in the National Museum of Anthropolo...
Coatlicue statue - Wikipedia