Legal theory
Law is a system of rules that are enforced through social institutions to govern behaviour. Laws can be made by legislatures through legislation (resulting in statutes), the executive through decrees ...
Legal theory - Wikipedia
Public international law
Public international law concerns the structure and conduct of sovereign states; analogous entities, such as the Holy See; and intergovernmental organizations. To a lesser degree, international law al...
Public international law - Wikipedia
Conflict of laws
Conflict of laws or Private international law (both terms are used interchangeably) concerns relations across different legal jurisdictions between persons, and sometimes also companies, corporations ...
European Union law
European Union law is a body of treaties and legislation, such as Regulations and Directives, which have direct effect or indirect effect on the laws of European Union member states. The three sources...
European Union law - Wikipedia
Constitutional Law
Constitutional law is the body of law which defines the relationship of different entities within a state, namely, the executive, the legislature, and the judiciary.Not all nation states have codified...
Administrative Law
Administrative law is the body of law that governs the activities of administrative agencies of government. Government agency action can include rulemaking, adjudication, or the enforcement of a speci...
Administrative Law - Wikipedia
Criminal law
Criminal law is the body of law that relates to crime. It regulates social conduct and prescribes whatever is threatening, harmful, or otherwise endangering to the property, health, safety, and moral ...
Criminal law - Wikipedia
Contract
In common law legal systems, a contract (or informally known as an agreement in some jurisdictions) is an agreement having a lawful object entered into voluntarily by two or more parties, each of whom...
Contract - Wikipedia
Tort
A tort, in common law jurisdictions, is a civil wrong that unfairly causes someone else to suffer loss or harm resulting in legal liability for the person who commits the tortious act, called a tortfe...
Tort - Wikipedia
Property law
Property law is the area of law that governs the various forms of ownership and tenancy in real property (land as distinct from personal or movable possessions) and in personal property, within the co...
Equity (law)
In jurisdictions following the English common law, equity is the set of maxims that "reign over all the law" and "from which flow all civil laws" (Bacon). The Chancery, the office of equity, was the "...
Equity (law) - Wikipedia
Trust (law)
In common law legal systems, a trust is a relationship whereby property is held by one party for the benefit of another. A trust is created by a settlor, who transfers some or all of his or her proper...
Legal systems of the world
The contemporary legal systems of the world are generally based on one of three basic systems: civil law, common law, and religious law – or combinations of these. However, the legal system of each c...
Legal systems of the world - Wikipedia
Civil law (legal system)
Civil law (or civilian law, Roman law) is a legal system originating in Europe, intellectualized within the framework of late Roman law, and whose most prevalent feature is that its core principles ar...
Civil law (legal system) - Wikipedia
Common Law
Common law (also known as case law or precedent) is law developed by judges through decisions of courts and similar tribunals that decide individual cases, as opposed to statutes adopted through the l...
Common Law - Wikipedia
Religious law
Religious law refers to ethical and moral codes taught by religious traditions. Examples include Christian canon law, Islamic sharia, Jewish halakha and Hindu law.The two most prominent systems, cano...
Legal history
Legal history or the history of law is the study of how law has evolved and why it changed. Legal history is closely connected to the development of civilisations and is set in the wider context of so...
Jurisprudence
Jurisprudence is the study and theory of law. Scholars in jurisprudence, also known as legal theorists (including legal philosophers and social theorists of law), hope to obtain a deeper understanding...
Jurisprudence - Wikipedia
Law and economics
Law and economics or economic analysis of law is the application of economic theory (specifically microeconomic theory) to the analysis of law. Economic concepts are used to explain the effects of law...
Sociology of law
The sociology of law (or legal sociology) is often described as a sub-discipline of sociology or an interdisciplinary approach within legal studies. Some see sociology of law as belonging "necessarily...
Sociology of law - Wikipedia
Judiciary
The judiciary (also known as the judicial system or court system) is the system of courts that interprets and applies the law in the name of the state. The judiciary also provides a mechanism for th...
Legislature
A legislature is a state's internal decision-making organization, usually associated with national government, that has the power to enact, amend, and repeal public policy. Legislatures observe and st...
Executive (government)
The executive is the part of the government that has sole authority and responsibility for the daily administration of the state. The executive branch executes, or enforces the law. The division of ...
Bureaucracy
A bureaucracy(/bjuːˈɒkrəsi/) is "a body of non-elective government officials" and/or "an administrative policy-making group". Historically, bureaucracy was government administration managed by departm...
Bureaucracy - Wikipedia
Legal profession
Legal profession is a profession, and legal professionals study, develop and apply law. Usually, there is a requirement for someone choosing a career in law to first obtain a law degree or some other ...
Legal profession - Wikipedia
Civil society
Civil society is the "aggregate of non-governmental organizations and institutions that manifest interests and will of citizens." Civil society includes the family and the private sphere, referred to ...