Julian the Apostate
Julian (Latin: Flavius Claudius Iulianus Augustus, Greek: Φλάβιος Κλαύδιος Ἰουλιανὸς Αὔγουστος; 331/332  – 26 June 363), also known as Julian the Apostate, was Roman Emperor from 361 to 3...
Henosis
Henosis (Ancient Greek: ἕνωσις) is the word for mystical "oneness," "union," or "unity" in classical Greek.In Platonism, and especially Neoplatonism, the goal of henosis is union with what is fun...
Henotheism
Henotheism (Greek εἷς θεός heis theos "one god") is the belief in and worship of a single God while accepting the existence or possible existence of other deities that may also be worshipped. The term...
Apocatastasis
Apocatastasis (/æpoʊkəˈtæstəsɨs/; from Greek: ἀποκατάστασις, also anglicized as apokatastasis) is reconstitution, restitution, or restoration to the original or primordial condition.
The Lidde...
Essentialism
Essentialism is the view that, for any specific entity (such as an animal, a group of people, a physical object, a concept), there is a set of attributes which are necessary to its identity and functi...
Ignosticism
Ignosticism or igtheism is the idea that every theological position assumes too much about the concept of God and other theological concepts; including (but not limited to) concepts of faith, spiritua...
Emanation
Emanationism is an idea in the cosmology or cosmogony of certain religious or philosophical systems. Emanation, from the Latin emanare meaning "to flow from" or "to pour forth or out of", is the mode ...
Greek hero cult
Hero cults were one of the most distinctive features of ancient Greek religion. In Homeric Greek, "hero" (ἥρως, hērōs) refers to a man who was fighting on either side during the Trojan War. By the hi...
Causality
Causality (also referred to as causation) is the relation between an event (the cause) and a second event (the effect), where the second event is understood as a physical consequence of the first.In c...