Jazz (word) - Ragtime tunes, Scott Joplin
Wally Rose, a very important jazz and ragtime pianist, that recorded lots of preciouses rags tunes from Scott Joplin, James Scott and others greats ragtime c...
Jazz royalty
Jazz royalty is a term encompassing the many jazz musicians who have been termed as exceptionally musically gifted and informally granted honorific, "aristocratic" or "royal" titles.The practice of af...
Swing music
Swing music, or simply swing, is a form of American music that developed in the early 1930s and became a distinctive style by 1940. Swing uses a strong rhythm section of double bass and drums as the a...
Territory band
Territory bands were dance bands that crisscrossed specific regions of the United States from the 1920s through the 1960s. Beginning in the 1920s, the bands typically had 8 to 12 musicians. These ba...
Mills Blue Rhythm Band
The Mills Blue Rhythm Band was an American big band of the 1930s.The band was formed in Harlem in 1930, with reedman Bingie Madison the first of its many leaders. It started life as the Coconut Grove ...
Mills Blue Rhythm Band - Wikipedia
Hipster (1940s subculture)
Hipster or hepcat, as used in the 1940s, referred to aficionados of jazz, in particular bebop, which became popular in the early 1940s. The hipster adopted the lifestyle of the jazz musician, includin...
Baltimore jazz
Baltimore jazz is a major part of the music of Baltimore, Maryland, and is a field that has produced several well-known artists, including Billie Holiday, Cab Calloway, Chick Webb and Cyrus Chestnut, ...
Ann Arbor Decision
The Ann Arbor Decision refers to the case of Martin Luther King Junior Elementary School Children et al. v. Ann Arbor School District. This case was decided on July 12, 1979 by Judge Charles W. Joiner...
Ebonics: The True Language of Black Folks
Ebonics: The True Language of Black Folks is a 1975 book written by Dr. Robert Williams, an African-American psychologist, who had coined the term "Ebonics" two years earlier. This book defines the te...
African American Vernacular English
African American Vernacular English (AAVE) — also called African American English; less precisely Black English, Black Vernacular, Black English Vernacular (BEV), or Black Vernacular English (BVE) — i...
African American Vernacular English - Wikipedia
Oklahoma City Blue Devils
The Oklahoma City Blue Devils was the premier Southwest territory jazz band in the 1920s. Originally called Billy King's Road Show, it disbanded in Oklahoma City in 1925 where Walter Page renamed it. ...
List of nicknames of jazz musicians
Nicknames are common among jazz musicians. Nicknames and sobriquets can also sometimes become stage names, and there are several cases of performers being known almost exclusively by their nicknames a...
Cotton Club Boys
The Cotton Club Boys was a territory band based in North Omaha, Nebraska in the 1930s. It was initially fronted by Anna Mae Winburn.
Personnel in the swing band included a variety of players. Trum...
Jazz dance
Jazz dance is a classification shared by a broad range of dance styles. Before the 1950s, jazz dance referred to dance styles that originated from African American vernacular dance. In the 1950s, a ne...
Jazz dance - Wikipedia
Square (slang)
Square used as slang may mean many things when referring to a person or in common language.In referring to a person, the word originally meant someone who was honest, traditional and loyal. An agreeme...
Indiana Avenue
Indiana Avenue is a historic area in downtown and is one of six designated cultural districts in Indianapolis, Indiana. Indiana Avenue was, during its glory days, an African American cultural center o...
Indiana Avenue - Wikipedia
Nat Towles
Nat Towles (August 10, 1905 – January 1963) was an African-American musician, jazz and big band leader popular in his hometown of New Orleans, Louisiana, North Omaha, Nebraska and Chicago, Illin...
Jazz funeral
Jazz funeral is a common name for a funeral tradition with music which developed in New Orleans, Louisiana.
The term "jazz funeral" was long in use by observers from elsewhere, but was general...
Jazz funeral - Wikipedia
Moldy figs
Moldy figs are purist advocates of early jazz, originally those such as Rudi Blesh, Alan Lomax, and James Jones who argued that jazz took a wrong turn in the early 1920s with developments such as the ...
Firecrackers. A Realistic Novel
Firecrackers. A Realistic Novel (1925), by Carl Van Vechten: Of the four (out of seven) novels that deal directly with what Carl Van Vechten called "the splendid drunken twenties" in New York, Firecra...
Firecrackers. A Realistic Novel - Wikipedia
New Big Band
New Big Band is a term used to refer to the revivalist movement of 21st Century Jazz artists who are bringing a new form of Big Band music that fuses elements of traditional swing bands of leaders lik...
New Big Band - Wikipedia
Loft jazz
The loft jazz scene was a cultural phenomenon that occurred in New York City during the mid-1970s, at venues such as Environ, Ali's Alley, and Studio Rivbea, all in former industrial loft spaces in NY...
Musicians' Village
Musicians' Village (New Orleans, Louisiana) is a new neighborhood built around a music center where musicians can teach and perform. Musicians Harry Connick, Jr. and Branford Marsalis teamed up with H...
Musicians' Village - Wikipedia
Coon-Sanders Original Nighthawk Orchestra
Coon-Sanders Original Nighthawk Orchestra was the first Kansas City jazz band to achieve national recognition, which it acquired through national radio broadcasts. It was founded in 1919, as the Coon-...