Inuksuk
An inuksuk (plural inuksuit) (from the Inuktitut: ᐃᓄᒃᓱᒃ, plural ᐃᓄᒃᓱᐃᑦ; alternatively inukshuk in English or inukhuk in Inuinnaqtun, inussuk in Greenlandic) is a stone landmark or cairn built by huma...
Poporo
Poporo is a device used by indigenous cultures in present and pre-Columbian South America for storage of small amounts of lime (mineral). It is constituted by two pieces: the receptacle, and the lid...
Olmec colossal heads
The Olmec colossal heads are at least seventeen monumental stone representations of human heads sculpted from large basalt boulders. The heads date from at least before 900 BC and are a distinctive fe...
Cuauhxicalli
A cuauhxicalli or quauhxicalli (/kʷaːʍʃiˈkalːi/, meaning "Eagle gourd bowl") was an altar-like stone vessel used by the Aztecs to contain human hearts extracted in sacrificial ceremonies. A cuahxicall...
Haida argillite carvings
Haida argillite carvings are a sculptural tradition among the Haida indigenous nation of the Northwest Coast of North America. It first became a widespread art form in the early 19th century, and cont...
Muiraquitã
Muiraquitã (from Tupi mbïraki'tã, "knot of trees", from muyrá / mbyra, "tree", "stick", "wood" and quit, "knot", "wart", "rounded object"), is the name given to various types of old artefacts of Amazo...
The Wrestler (sculpture)
The Wrestler is an ancient basalt statuette that is one of the most important sculptures of the Olmec culture. The near life-size figure has been praised not only for its realism and sense of energy...
Zemi
A zemi or cemi is a deity or ancestral spirit, and a sculptural object that houses the spirit, among the Taíno. They were also created by neighboring tribes in the Caribbean and northern South America...
Chac Mool
Chacmool (also spelled chac-mool) is the term used to refer to a particular form of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican sculpture depicting a reclining figure with its head facing 90 degrees from the front, su...