Imperial cult (ancient Rome)
The Imperial cult of ancient Rome identified emperors and some members of their families with the divinely sanctioned authority of the Roman State. The framework for the Imperial cult was formulated d...
Imperial cult (ancient Rome) - Wikipedia
Bones Of Philip Of Macedon Identified
The famous "Tomb of Philip" is not after all the tomb in which the remains of the legendary king Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great, were laid to rest. Another adjacent well-known tom...
Remains of Philip II, father of Alexander the Great, confirmed found
Buried beneath a large mound located in the village of Vergina in northern Greece, an archaeological excavation carried out in 1977 by Greek archaeologists Manolis Andronikos uncovered a spectacular t...
Res divina
In ancient Rome, res divinae, singular res divina (Latin for "divine matters," that is, the service of the gods), were the laws that pertained to the religious duties of the state and its officials. ...
Augur
The augur was a priest and official in the classical world, especially ancient Rome and Etruria. His main role was the practice of augury, interpreting the will of the gods by studying the flight of b...
Augur - Wikipedia
Hellenistic religion
Hellenistic religion is any of the various systems of beliefs and practices of the people who lived under the influence of ancient Greek culture during the Hellenistic period and the Roman Empire (c. ...
Hellenistic religion - Wikipedia
Larnax
A larnax (plural larnakes; Ancient Greek: λάρναξ, λάρνακες) is a type of small closed coffin, box or "ash-chest" often used as a container for human remains in ancient Macedonia, either a body (b...
Larnax - Wikipedia
Bones Of Philip Of Macedon Identified
The famous "Tomb of Philip" is not after all the tomb in which the remains of the legendary king Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great, were laid to rest. Another adjacent well-known tom...
Ptolemaic Kingdom
The Ptolemaic Kingdom (/ˌtɒləˈmeɪ.ɪk/; Greek: Πτολεμαϊκὴ βασιλεία, Ptolemaïkḕ Basileía) was a Hellenistic kingdom based in Egypt. It was ruled by the Ptolemaic dynasty which started with Ptolemy I...
Ptolemaic Kingdom - Wikipedia
Callias of Chalcis
Callias of Chalcis (Greek: Kαλλίας; fl. 4th century BC), son of Mnesarchus, together with his brother Taurosthenes, succeeded his father in the tyranny of Chalcis, and formed an alliance with Philip o...
Derveni papyrus
The Derveni papyrus is an ancient Greek papyrus roll that was found in 1962. It is a philosophical treatise that is an allegorical commentary on an Orphic poem, a theogony concerning the birth of the ...
Derveni papyrus - Wikipedia
Hipparchus of Euboea
Hipparchus or Hipparch of Euboea (Greek: Ἵππαρχος; fl. 4th century BC) was one of the warmest partisans of Philip of Macedon, who rewarded him for his zeal by appointing him, together with Automed...
Imperial cult
An imperial cult is a form of state religion in which an emperor, or a dynasty of emperors (or rulers of another title), are worshipped as messiahs, demigods or deities. "Cult" here is used to mean "w...
Imperial cult - Wikipedia
Abraham River
The Abraham River (Arabic: نهر ابراهيم‎, Nahr Ibrahim) also known as Adonis River, is a small river in the Mount Lebanon Governorate in Lebanon. It passes through the town of Nahr Ibrahim be...
Abraham River - Wikipedia
Ateas
Ateas (ca. 429 BC–339 BC) was described in Greek and Roman sources as the most powerful king of Scythia, who lost his life and empire in the conflict with Philip II of Macedon in 339 BC. His na...
Aeschines
Aeschines (/ˈɪskɨniːz/; Greek: Αἰσχίνης, Aischínēs; 389 – 314 BC) was a Greek statesman and one of the ten Attic orators.
Although it is known he was born in Athens, the records regarding hi...
Peace of Philocrates
Peace of Philocrates is the name given to the peace treaty concluded in 346 BC between Athens and Macedon under Philip II. Philocrates was the name of the main Athenian negotiator of the Treaty.
...
Polyidus of Thessaly
Polyidus of Thessaly (also Polyides, Polydus; Ancient Greek: Πολύειδος ὁ Θεσσαλός, English translation: "well-grounded", "wise") was an ancient Greek military engineer of Philip, who made improvements...
Philip II of Macedon
Philip II of Macedon (Greek: Φίλιππος Βʹ ὁ Μακεδών, Phílippos II ho Makedṓn; 382–336 BC) was the King (Basileus) of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination ...
Philip II of Macedon - Wikipedia
Hypsistarians
Hypsistarians, i.e. worshippers of the Hypsistos (Greek: Ὕψιστος, the "Most High" God), is a term appearing in documents dated about 200 BC to about AD 400, referring to various groups mostly in A...
Charidemus
Charidemus (Greek: Χαρίδημος), of Oreus in Euboea, was a Greek mercenary leader of the 4th century BC.About 367 BC, he fought under the Athenian general Iphicrates against Amphipolis. Being ordered by...
Pelinna
Pelinna (Latin: Pelinnaeum) was an ancient Greek city with a celebrated temple of Zeus Pelinnaeus, in Estiaeotis, ancient Thessaly. Pelinna was situated between Tricca and Pharcadon, near modern Pala...
Pelinna - Wikipedia
Battus I of Cyrene
Battus I of Cyrene (Ancient Greek: Βάττος), also known as Battus Aristottle (Βάττος Ἀριστοτέλης) or Aristaeus (Ἀρισταίος) was the founder of the Ancient Greek colony of Cyrenaica and its capital ...
Alexander the Great
Alexander III of Macedon (20/21 July 356 – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander the Great (Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας, Aléxandros ho Mégas from the Greek: ἀλέξω alexo "to defend, hel...
Alexander the Great - Wikipedia
Aretalogy
Aretalogy is a form of sacred biography where a deity's attributes are listed, in the form of poem or text, in the first person.
Often each line starts with the standard "I am …". Usually, aretal...