Idolatry
Idolatry is the worship of an idol or a physical object as a representation of a god. In all the Abrahamic religions idolatry is strongly forbidden, although views as to what constitutes idolatry may ...
Idolatry - Wikipedia
Murti
In Hinduism, a murti (Devanagari: मूर्ति), or murthi, or vigraha or pratima typically refers to an image that expresses a Divine Spirit (murta). Meaning literally "embodiment", a murti is a represent...
Murti - Wikipedia
Puja (Buddhism)
In Buddhism, puja (Sanskrit & Pali: pūjā) are expressions of "honour, worship and devotional attention." Acts of puja include bowing, making offerings and chanting. These devotional acts are gene...
Idolatry and Christianity
A cult image or idol is a material object, representing a deity, to which religious worship is directed. It is also controversially and pejoratively used by some Protestants to describe the Orthodox C...
Aniconism in Christianity
Christianity has not generally practised aniconism, or the avoidance or prohibition of types of images, but has had an active tradition of making and venerating images of God and other religious figur...
Aniconism in Christianity - Wikipedia
Shirk (Islam)
In Islam, shirk (Arabic: شرك‎ širk) is the sin of practising idolatry or polytheism, i.e. the deification or worship of anyone or anything other than the singular God i.e. Allah. Literally, ...
Taghut
The Arabic word taghut or taaghoot (ar. طاغوت, ṭāġūt, pl. ṭawāġīt) means to "cross the limits, overstep boundaries," or "to rebel." In Islamic theology, the word refers to idolatry or to worship anyth...
Aniconism in Islam
Aniconism in Islam is a proscription in Islam against the creation of images of sentient living beings. The most absolute proscription is of images of God in Islam, followed by depictions of Muhammad,...
Aniconism in Islam - Wikipedia
Idolatry in Judaism
Judaism strongly prohibits any form of idolatry. Idolatry is one of Judaism's three cardinal sins, regarding which an individual is required to give up their life rather than violate. Judaism holds th...
Aniconism in Judaism
Aniconism in Judaism covers a number of areas. The portrayal of Yahweh in any kind of human or concrete form is absolutely forbidden, and there is a strong tradition of avoiding sculpture, especially ...
Aniconism in Judaism - Wikipedia
Aniconism
Aniconism is the practice of or belief in the avoiding or shunning of images of divine beings, prophets or other respected religious figures, or in different manifestations, any human beings or living...
Aniconism - Wikipedia
Statolatry
Statolatry, which combines idolatry with the state, first appeared in Giovanni Gentile's Doctrine of Fascism, published in 1931 under Mussolini's name, and was also mentioned in Gramsci's Prison Noteb...
Buddhas of Bamiyan
67°49′36.49″E / 34.8320417°N 67.8268028°E / 34.8320417; 67.8268028The Buddhas of Bamiyan (Persian: بت های باميان – but hay-e bamiyan) were two 6th-century monumental statues o...
Buddhas of Bamiyan - Wikipedia
Idolatry in Sikhism
Idolatry or Idol worship, also referred to as But-prasati or Pahan Pooja or Murti Pooja, is worship of any physical object such as statue, idols, images, sculptures of any deity or human or attributes...
Idolatry in Sikhism - Wikipedia
Astrolatry
Astrolatry is the worship of stars and other heavenly bodies as deities, or the association of deities with heavenly bodies.The most common instances of this are sun gods and moon gods in polytheisti...
Iconoclasm
Iconoclasm is the destruction of religious icons and other images or monuments for religious or political motives. In time, the word, usually in the adjectival form, has also come to refer to aggress...
Iconoclasm - Wikipedia
Depictions of Muhammad
The permissibility of depictions of Muhammad in Islam has been a contentious issue. Oral and written descriptions are readily accepted by all traditions of Islam, but there is disagreement about visua...
Depictions of Muhammad - Wikipedia
Shiva linga
The lingam (also linga, ling, Shiva linga, Shiv ling, Sanskrit: लिङ्गं,liṅgaṃ, meaning "mark", "sign", or "inference") is a representation of the Hindu deity Shiva used for worship in temples. In ...
Shiva linga - Wikipedia
Aniconism in Buddhism
Since the beginning of the serious study of the history of Buddhist art in the 1890s, the earliest phase, lasting until the 1st century CE, has been described as aniconic; the Buddha was only represen...
Council of Jerusalem
Council of Jerusalem (or Apostolic Conference) is a name applied by historians and theologians to a Christian Apostolic Age council that was held in Jerusalem and dated to around the year 50 AD. It is...
Council of Jerusalem - Wikipedia
Saligrama
Shila, (शिला in Devanagari, śila in IAST) or Shaligram refers to a Vaishnava (Hindu) aniconic representation of Vishnu, in the form of a spherical, usually black-coloured Ammonoid fossil found in the ...
Early Christian art
Early Christian art and architecture (or Paleochristian art) is the art produced by Christians or under Christian patronage from the earliest period of Christianity to, depending on the definition use...
Depiction of Jesus
The depiction of Jesus in pictorial form was controversial in the early Church. The depiction of him in art took several centuries to reach a conventional standardized form for his physical appearance...
Depiction of Jesus - Wikipedia
Byzantine Iconoclasm
Byzantine Iconoclasm (Greek: Εἰκονομαχία, Eikonomachía) refers to two periods in the history of the Byzantine Empire when the use of religious images or icons was opposed by religious and imperial...
Byzantine Iconoclasm - Wikipedia
False god
In monotheistic religious denominations, competing entities or objects to which particular importance is attributed are often called false gods, as exampled by 2 Kings 17:30(NLV) which states with ref...
False god - Wikipedia
The Reformation and art
The Protestant Reformation during the 16th century in Europe almost entirely rejected the existing tradition of Catholic art, and very often destroyed as much of it as it could reach. A new artistic ...
The Reformation and art - Wikipedia