History of logic
The history of logic is the study of the development of the science of valid inference (logic). Formal logic was developed in ancient times in China, India, and Greece. Greek logic, particularly Aris...
History of logic - Wikipedia
'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
Organon
The Organon (Greek: Ὄργανον, meaning "instrument, tool, organ") is the standard collection of Aristotle's six works on logic. The name Organon was given by Aristotle's followers, the Peripatetics. The...
Indian logic
The development of Indian logic dates back to the anviksiki of Medhatithi Gautama (c. 6th century BCE) the Sanskrit grammar rules of Pāṇini (c. 5th century BCE); the Vaisheshika school's analysis of a...
Logic in China
Logic in China plays a particularly interesting role in the history of logic due to its repression and abandonment compared to the strong ancient adoption and continued development of the study of log...
Logic in Islamic philosophy
Logic (Arabic: منطق‎) plays an important role in Islamic philosophy. Islamic law placed importance on formulating standards of argument, which gave rise to a novel approach to logic in Kalam...
Avicennism
Avicenna (/ˌævəˈsɛnə/; Latinate form of Ibn-Sīnā (Persian: پور سینا / ابن سینا‎‍; Arabic: ابن سینا‎‍), full name Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn Al-Hasan ibn Ali ib...
Avicennism - Wikipedia
Term logic
In philosophy, term logic, also known as traditional logic or Aristotelian logic, is a loose name for the way of doing logic that began with Aristotle and that was dominant until the advent of modern ...
Buddhist logic
Buddhist Logic, the categorical nomenclature modern Western discourse has extended to Buddhadharma traditions of 'Hetuvidya' (Sanskrit) and 'Pramanavada' (Sanskrit), which arose circa 500, is a partic...
Jansenism
Jansenism was a Catholic theological movement, primarily in France, that emphasized original sin, human depravity, the necessity of divine grace, and predestination. The movement originated from the p...
Jansenism - Wikipedia
Nyaya
Nyāya (Sanskrit: न्याय, ny-āyá), literally means "rules", "method" or "judgment". It is also the name of one of the six orthodox (astika) schools of Hinduism. This school's most significant contributi...
School of Names
The Logicians or School of Names (Chinese: 名家; pinyin: Míngjiā) was a school of Chinese philosophy that grew out of Mohism during the Warring States period in 479–221 BCE. It is also sometime...
History of statistics
The History of statistics can be said to start around 1749 although, over time, there have been changes to the interpretation of the word statistics. In early times, the meaning was restricted to info...
History of statistics - Wikipedia
'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
The Canon of Medicine
The Canon of Medicine (Arabic: القانون في الطب‎ al-Qānūn fī al-Ṭibb) is an encyclopedia of medicine in five books compiled by Persian philosopher Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna) and completed in 1025. I...
The Canon of Medicine - Wikipedia
Dharmakirti
Dharmakīrti (fl. c. 7th century) also known as Serlingpa Dharmakīrti or Suvarnadvipi Dharmakīrti, was a Buddhist scholar of Srivijayan origin, specifically from Suvarnadvipa (Sumatra). He was one of t...
Dharmakirti - Wikipedia
Madhyamākalaṃkāra
Madhyamakalamkara (Sanskrit) Madhyamākalaṃkāra (IAST) (8th century ) is a Buddhist text held to have been originally composed in Sanskrit by Śāntarakṣita (725–788) but extant in Tibetan. The Tibetan t...
Madhyamākalaṃkāra - Wikipedia
Hetucakra
Hetucakra is a Sanskrit text on logic written by Dignaga (c 480–540 CE) . It concerns the application of his 'three modes’ (trairūpya) in a valid inference within the Indian logico-epistemic traditi...
Action algebra
In algebraic logic, an action algebra is an algebraic structure which is both a residuated semilattice and a Kleene algebra. It adds the star or reflexive transitive closure operation of the latter t...
Port-Royal Logic
Port-Royal Logic, or Logique de Port-Royal, is the common name of La logique, ou l'art de penser, an important textbook on logic first published anonymously in 1662 by Antoine Arnauld and Pierre Nicol...
Vātsyāyana
Vātsyāyana is the name of a Hindu philosopher in the Vedic tradition who is believed to have lived around 2nd century CE in India. His name appears as the author of the Kama Sutra and of Nyāya Sutra B...
Benson Mates
Benson Mates (May 19, 1919, Portland, Oregon – May 14, 2009, Berkeley, California) was an American philosopher, noted for his work in logic, the history of philosophy, and skepticism. Mates studied p...
Śāntarakṣita
Śāntarakṣita (Sanskrit: शान्तरक्षित, Wylie: zhi ba tsho, 725–788) was a renowned 8th century Indian Buddhist Brahmin and abbot of Nalanda. Śāntarakṣita founded the philosophical school known as Yo...
Osmund Lewry
Patrick Osmund Lewry (1929–1987) was a Dominican who made significant contributions to the history of logic and the philosophy of language in the thirteenth century. Lewry studied mathematical logic ...
Classical element
Many philosophies and worldviews have a set of classical elements believed to reflect the simplest essential parts and principles of which anything can consist or upon which the constitution and funda...
Classical element - Wikipedia
Sum of Logic
The Summa Logicae ("Sum of Logic") is a textbook on logic by William of Ockham. It was written around 1323.Systematically, it resembles other works of medieval logic, organised under the basic heading...
Ramism
Ramism was a collection of theories on rhetoric, logic and pedagogy based on the teachings of Petrus Ramus, a French academic, philosopher and Huguenot convert who was murdered in 1572 during the St. ...