History of early Christianity
The history of early Christianity covers Christianity from its origins to the First Council of Nicaea in 325.The first part of the period, during the lifetimes of the Twelve Apostles, is traditionally...
History of early Christianity - Wikipedia
Origins of Christianity
Early Christianity and Early Rabbinical Judaism were significantly influenced by Hellenistic religion and Hellenistic philosophy. Christianity in particular inherited many features of Greco-Roman pag...
Origins of Christianity - Wikipedia
Cultural and historical background of Jesus
Most scholars who study the Historical Jesus and Early Christianity believe that the Canonical Gospels and life of Jesus must be viewed as firmly placed within his historical and cultural context, ra...
Cultural and historical background of Jesus - Wikipedia
Ministry of Jesus
In the Christian gospels, the ministry of Jesus begins with his baptism in the countryside of Roman Judea and Transjordan, near the river Jordan, and ends in Jerusalem, following the Last Supper with ...
Ministry of Jesus - Wikipedia
Apostolic Age
The Apostolic Age of the history of Christianity is traditionally the period of the Twelve Apostles, dating from the Great Commission of the Apostles by the resurrected Jesus in Jerusalem c. 33 until ...
Apostolic Age - Wikipedia
Early centers of Christianity
Early Christianity (generally considered the time period from its start to 325), spread from the Eastern Mediterranean throughout the Roman Empire and beyond, reaching as far east as India. Originally...
Early centers of Christianity - Wikipedia
Pauline Christianity
Pauline Christianity is the Christianity associated with the beliefs and doctrines espoused by Paul the Apostle through his writings. Most of Christianity relies heavily on these teachings and conside...
Ante-Nicene Period
The Ante-Nicene Period (literally meaning "before Nicaea") of the history of early Christianity refers to the period following the Apostolic Age of the 1st century down to the First Council of Nicaea ...
Split of early Christianity and Judaism
The split of early Christianity and Judaism took place during the first centuries of the Common Era. It is commonly attributed to a number of events, including the rejection and crucifixion of Jesus (...
Split of early Christianity and Judaism - Wikipedia
Constantine I and Christianity
While the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (reigned 306–337) ruled, Christianity began to transition to the dominant religion of the Roman Empire. Historians remain uncertain about Constantine's re...
Constantine I and Christianity - Wikipedia
First seven Ecumenical Councils
In the history of Christianity, the first seven ecumenical councils, from the First Council of Nicaea (325) to the Second Council of Nicaea (787), represented an attempt to reach an orthodox consensus...
First seven Ecumenical Councils - Wikipedia
First Council of Nicaea
The First Council of Nicaea (/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈni:kaɪja]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Nicaea in Bithynia by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325. This first ecum...
First Council of Nicaea - Wikipedia
State church of the Roman Empire
Nicene Christianity became the state church of the Roman Empire with the Edict of Thessalonica in AD 380, when Emperor Theodosius I made it the Empire's sole authorized religion. The Eastern Orthodox ...
State church of the Roman Empire - Wikipedia
History of late ancient Christianity
The History of Late Ancient Christianity traces Christianity during the Christian Roman Empire - the period from the rise of Christianity under Emperor Constantine (c. 313), until the fall of the Roma...
History of late ancient Christianity - Wikipedia
Matthew 4:22
Matthew 4:22 is the twenty-second verse of the fourth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. After recruiting Simon Peter and Andrew as disciples Jesus encountered the brothers James a...
Parable of the Friend at Night
The Parable of the Friend at Night (or of the Importunate Neighbour), is a parable of Jesus, which appears in only one of the Canonical gospels of the New Testament. According to the Luke 11:5-8, a ...
Parable of the Friend at Night - Wikipedia
New Wine into Old Wineskins
New Wine into Old Wineskins is, according to the New Testament, one of a pair of parables told by Jesus. It is found at Matthew 9:14-17, Mark 2:21-22 and Luke 5:33-39. A version of the parable also ap...
New Wine into Old Wineskins - Wikipedia
The New Commandment
The New Commandment of Jesus to "love one another" is part of the final instructions given to his disciples after the Last Supper had "ended", and after Judas Iscariot had departed in John 13:30.This ...
The New Commandment - Wikipedia
Archbishop Maximianus of Constantinople
Maximianus was the archbishop of Constantinople from 25 October 431 until his death on 12 April 434.
Maximianus had led a monastic life and had entered presbyteral orders; his action in building, ...
Bishop of Rome
The Pope (Latin: papa; from Greek: πάππας pappas, a child's word for father) is the Bishop of Rome and the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church. The importance of the Roman bishop is largel...
Bishop of Rome - Wikipedia
Parable of the Two Sons
The Parable of the Two Sons is a parable told by Jesus in the New Testament, found in Matthew 21:28–32. It contrasts the tax collectors and prostitutes who accepted the message taught by John the Bapt...
Parable of the Two Sons - Wikipedia
Parable of the talents or minas
The Parable of the Talents (also the Parable of the Minas and the Parable of the Pounds), is one of the parables of Jesus, which appears in two of the canonical gospels of the New Testament; a themati...
Parable of the talents or minas - Wikipedia
Jesus in the Talmud
The Talmud contains passages that some scholars have concluded are references to Christian traditions about Jesus. The history of textual transmission of these passages is complex and scholars are not...
Jesus in the Talmud - Wikipedia
Christology
Christology (from Greek Χριστός Khristós and -λογία, -logia) is the field of study within Christian theology which is primarily concerned with the nature and person of Jesus as recorded in the canonic...
Christology - Wikipedia
Legalism (theology)
Legalism, in Christian theology, is a usually pejorative term referring to an over-emphasis on discipline of conduct, or legal ideas, usually implying an allegation of misguided rigour, pride, superf...
Alogi
The Alogi (ἄλογοι, also called "Alogians") were a group of heterodox Christians in Asia Minor that flourished around 170 CE. What we know of them is derived from their doctrinal opponents, whose liter...
Paul of Tarsus and Judaism
The relationship between Paul the Apostle and Second Temple Judaism continues to be the subject of much scholarly research, as it is thought that Paul played an important role in the relationship betw...
Paul of Tarsus and Judaism - Wikipedia
Christianity in Iran
Christianity has a long history in Iran, dating back to the early years of the faith. It has been practiced in Iran longer than the state religion, Islam. It has always been a minority religion, with ...
Christianity in Iran - Wikipedia
Constantinian shift
Constantinian shift is a term used by Nontrinitarian Christians, as well as Anabaptist and Post-Christendom theologians, to describe the political and theological aspects of the 4th-century process of...
Constantinian shift - Wikipedia