Hellenization
Hellenization (American English) or Hellenisation (British) is the historical spread of ancient Greek culture and, to a lesser extent, language, over foreign peoples conquered by Greece or brought int...
Hellenization - Wikipedia
Hellenistic civilization
The Hellenistic period is the period of ancient Greek and Mediterranean history between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire as signified by the Battle of A...
Hellenistic civilization - Wikipedia
Hellenistic Judaism
Hellenistic Judaism was a form of Judaism in the ancient world that combined Jewish religious tradition with elements of Greek culture. Until the fall of the Roman Empire and the Muslim conquests of t...
Hellenistic Judaism - Wikipedia
Aethiopica
Aethiopica (Αἰθιοπικά "The Ethiopian Story") or Theagenes and Chariclea is an ancient Greek romance or novel. It was written by Heliodorus of Emesa and is his only known work.
Socrates Scholasticu...
Aethiopica - Wikipedia
Warwick Vase
The Warwick Vase is an ancient Roman marble vase with Bacchic ornament that was discovered at Hadrian's Villa, Tivoli about 1771 by Gavin Hamilton, a Scottish painter-antiquarian and art dealer in Ro...
Warwick Vase - Wikipedia
Epigonus
Epigonus (Greek: Ἐπίγονος) of Pergamum was the chief among the court sculptors to the Attalid dynasty at Pergamum in the late third century BCE. Pliny the Elder, who offers the only surviving list...
Epigonus - Wikipedia
Amarantus of Alexandria
Amarantus of Alexandria (Greek: Ἀμάραντος) was an ancient Greek writer who wrote a commentary on one of the idylls attributed to Theocritus, possibly from the writings of Theon, and a work titled On t...
Amarantus of Alexandria - Wikipedia
Franciscus Patricius
Franciscus Patricius (Italian: Francesco Patrizi, Croatian: Frane Petrić; 25 April 1529 – 6 February 1597) was a philosopher and scientist from the Republic of Venice. He was known as a defender of Pl...
Franciscus Patricius - Wikipedia
Asclepiodotus of Alexandria
Asclepiodotus (Greek: Άσκληπιόδοτος) of Alexandria was a Neoplatonic philosopher who lived in the second half of the 5th century. He was a native of Alexandria who studied under Proclus in Athens....
Hieronymus of Cardia
Hieronymus of Cardia (Greek: Ἱερώνυμος), Greek general and historian from Cardia in Thrace, was a contemporary of Alexander the Great (356–323 BC).After the death of Alexander he followed the fort...
Hellenistic astrology
Hellenistic astrology is a tradition of horoscopic astrology that was developed and practiced in the late Hellenistic period in and around the Mediterranean region, especially in Egypt. The texts and ...
Hellenistic astrology - Wikipedia
Boethusians
The Boethusians were a Jewish sect closely related to, if not a development of, the Sadducees.
The post-Talmudic work Avot de-Rabbi Natan gives the following origin of the schism between the Phari...
Origen
Origen (/ˈɒrɪdʒən/; Greek: Ὠριγένης, Ōrigénēs), or Origen Adamantius (Ὠριγένης Ἀδαμάντιος, Ōrigénēs Adamántios; 184/185 – 253/254), was a scholar and early Christian theologian who was born and ...
Origen - Wikipedia
Callisthenes
Callisthenes of Olynthus ((/kəˈlɪsθəˌniːz/); Greek: Καλλισθένης; c. 360 – 328 BC) was a Greek historian. He was the son of Hero (niece of Aristotle), the daughter of Proxenus of Atarneus and Arimnest...
Dancing Satyr of Mazara del Vallo
The over-lifesize Dancing Satyr of Mazara del Vallo is a Greek bronze statue, whose refinement and rapprochement with the manner of Praxiteles has made it a subject of discussion.
Though the satyr...
Dancing Satyr of Mazara del Vallo - Wikipedia
Pasquino
Pasquino or Pasquin (Latin: Pasquillus) is the name used by Romans since the early modern period to describe a battered Hellenistic-style statue dating to the 3rd century BC, which was unearthed in th...
Pasquino - Wikipedia
Ludovisi Dionysus
The over-lifesize marble Dionysus with Panther and Satyr in the Palazzo Altemps, Rome, is a Roman work of the 2nd century CE, found in the 16th century on the Quirinal Hill at the time foundations wer...
Ludovisi Dionysus - Wikipedia
Roma (mythology)
In ancient Roman religion, Roma was a female deity who personified the city of Rome and more broadly, the Roman state. Her image appears on the base of the column of Antoninus Pius.
A helmeted fig...
Roma (mythology) - Wikipedia
Epistates
An epistates (Ancient Greek: ἐπιστάτης) in ancient Greece was any sort of superintendent or overseer. In Hellenistic kingdoms generally, an epistates is always connected with a subject district ...
Henotheism
Henotheism (Greek εἷς θεός heis theos "one god") is the belief in and worship of a single God while accepting the existence or possible existence of other deities that may also be worshipped. The term...
Sleeping Ariadne
The Sleeping Ariadne, housed in the Vatican Museums in Vatican City, is a Roman Hadrianic copy of a Hellenistic sculpture of the Pergamene school of the 2nd century BCE, and is one of the most renown...
Sleeping Ariadne - Wikipedia
Antigonid dynasty
The Antigonid dynasty (/ænˈtɪɡɵnɪd/; Greek: Ἀντιγονίδαι) was a dynasty of Hellenistic kings descended from Alexander the Great's general Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-eyed").
Succeeding the ...
Antigonid dynasty - Wikipedia
Atargatis
Atargatis /əˈtɑrɡətɨs/ or Ataratheh (/əˈtærəθə/; Aramaic: ‘Atar‘atheh or Tar‘atheh‎) was the chief goddess of northern Syria in Classical Antiquity. Ctesias also used the name Derceto for her, a...
Hellenes (religion)
The Greeks (Greek: Έλληνες) have been identified by many ethnonyms. The most common native ethnonym is "Hellen" (Ἕλλην), pl. "Hellenes" (Ἕλληνες); the name "Greeks" (Latin: "Graeci") was used by ...
Hellenes (religion) - Wikipedia
Hades in Christianity
According to various Christian denominations, Hades is "the place or state of departed spirits".
In the Septuagint (the ancient translation of the Old Testament into Greek), the Greek term "ᾅδης" ...
Hades in Christianity - Wikipedia
Parmenion (architect)
Parmenion was an architect, who was employed by Alexander the Great in the building of Alexandria. He was entrusted with the superintendence of the works of sculpture, especially in the temple of Sera...
Aretalogy
Aretalogy is a form of sacred biography where a deity's attributes are listed, in the form of poem or text, in the first person.
Often each line starts with the standard "I am …". Usually, aretal...
Laocoön and His Sons
The statue of Laocoön and His Sons (Italian: Gruppo del Laocoonte), also called the Laocoön Group, has been one of the most famous ancient sculptures ever since it was excavated in Rome in 1506 an...
Laocoön and His Sons - Wikipedia
Aeschylus of Alexandria
Aeschylus (Gr. Αισχύλος) of Alexandria was an epic poet who must have lived before the end of the 2nd century, and whom Athenaeus calls a well-informed man. One of his poems bore the title "Amphitryo...
Chaldean Oracles
The Chaldean Oracles have survived as fragmentary texts from the 2nd century AD, and consist mainly of Hellenistic commentary on a single mystery-poem (which may have been compilations from several o...
Barnabas
Saint Barnabas (Greek: Βαρνάβας), born Joseph, was an early Christian, one of the prominent Christian disciples in Jerusalem. According to Acts 4:36 Barnabas was a Cypriot Jew. Named an apostle in (Ac...
Barnabas - Wikipedia