Hellenistic philosophy
Hellenistic philosophy is the period of Western philosophy that was developed in the Hellenistic civilization following Aristotle and ending with the beginning of Neoplatonism.
Pythagoreanism is t...
Cynicism
Cynic or Cynicism may mean:
Epicureanism
Epicureanism is a system of philosophy based upon the teachings of the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus, founded around 307 BC. Epicurus was an atomic materialist, following in the steps of Democrit...
Neoplatonism
Neoplatonism (or Neo-Platonism) is a modern term used to designate a tradition of philosophy that arose in the 3rd century AD and persisted until shortly after the closing of the Platonic Academy in A...
Stoicism
Stoicism is a school of Hellenistic philosophy founded in Athens by Zeno of Citium in the early 3rd century BC. The Stoics taught that destructive emotions resulted from errors in judgment, and that a...
Stoicism - Wikipedia
Simplicius of Cilicia
Simplicius (/sɪmˈplɪʃiəs/; Greek: Σιμπλίκιος; c. 490 – c. 560) of Cilicia, was a disciple of Ammonius Hermiae and Damascius, and was one of the last of the Neoplatonists. He was among the pagan ph...
Simplicius of Cilicia - Wikipedia
The Republic (Zeno)
The Republic (Greek: Πολιτεία) was a work written by Zeno of Citium, the founder of Stoic philosophy at the beginning of the 3rd century BCE. Although it has not survived, it was his most famous w...
Marsilio Ficino
Marsilio Ficino ([marˈsiljo fiˈtʃino]; Latin name Marsilius Ficinus; 19 October 1433 – 1 October 1499) was an Italian scholar and Catholic priest who was one of the most influential humanist phil...
Marsilio Ficino - Wikipedia
Cynic epistles
The Cynic epistles are a collection of letters expounding the principles and practices of Cynic philosophy mostly written in the time of the Roman empire but purporting to have been written by much ea...
Salutius
Saturninius Secundus Salutius was a career Roman official who was a native of Gaul. He was a quaestor when he became a member of Julian's staff, while the latter was Caesar in Gaul. Salutius was well ...
De Beneficiis
De Beneficiis [ Latin ] is a first-century work by Seneca the Younger (c. 4 BC – 65 AD). It forms part of a series of moral essays (or "Dialogues") composed by Seneca, whose other philosophical expl...
Panaetius
Panaetius (/pəˈniːʃiəs/; Greek: Παναίτιος; c. 185 - c. 110/109 BC) of Rhodes was a Stoic philosopher. He was a pupil of Diogenes of Babylon and Antipater of Tarsus in Athens, before moving to Rome whe...
Panaetius - Wikipedia
Prohairesis
Prohairesis (Ancient Greek: προαίρεσις; variously translated as "moral character", "will", "volition", "choice", "intention", or "moral choice") is a fundamental concept in the Stoic philosophy o...
Soter
Soter derives from the Greek epithet σωτήρ (sōtēr), meaning a saviour, a deliverer; initial capitalised Σωτήρ; fully capitalised ΣΩΤΗΡ; feminine Soteria (Σωτηρία). Soter has been used as:
Zeno of Citium
Zeno of Citium (/ˈziːnoʊ/; Greek: Ζήνων ὁ Κιτιεύς, Zēnōn ho Kitieus; c. 334 – c. 262 BC) was a Greek thinker from Citium (Κίτιον, Kition), Cyprus. He was possibly of Phoenician descent,. Zeno was ...
Zeno of Citium - Wikipedia
Academic skepticism
Academic skepticism refers to the skeptical period of ancient Platonism dating from around 266 BC, when Arcesilaus became head of the Platonic Academy, until around 90 BC, when Antiochus of Ascalon re...
Academic skepticism - Wikipedia
Eretrian school
The Eretrian school of philosophy was originally the School of Elis where it had been founded by Phaedo of Elis; it was later transferred to Eretria by his pupil Menedemus. It can be referred to as th...
Franciscus Patricius
Franciscus Patricius (Italian: Francesco Patrizi, Croatian: Frane Petrić; 25 April 1529 – 6 February 1597) was a philosopher and scientist from the Republic of Venice. He was known as a defender of Pl...
Franciscus Patricius - Wikipedia
Diotimus the Stoic
Diotimus (Greek: Διότιμος) was a Stoic philosopher, who lived c. 100 BC.He is said to have accused Epicurus of being depraved, and to have forged fifty letters, professing to have been written by ...
Anaxarchus
Anaxarchus (/ˌænəɡˈzɑrkəs/; Greek: Ἀνάξαρχος; c. 380 – c. 320 BC) was a Greek philosopher of the school of Democritus. Together with Pyrrho, he accompanied Alexander the Great into Asia. The repor...
Passing of Peregrinus
The Passing of Peregrinus or The Death of Peregrinus (Greek: Περὶ τῆς Περεγρίνου Τελευτῆς; Latin: De Morte Peregrini) is a satire by the Syrian Greek writer Lucian in which the lead character,...
Villa of the Papyri
14°20′40″E / 40.8078°N 14.3445°E / 40.8078; 14.3445The Villa of the Papyri (Italian: Villa dei Papiri, also known as Villa dei Pisoni) is a private house in the ancient Ro...
Villa of the Papyri - Wikipedia
Hermagoras of Amphipolis
Hermagoras of Amphipolis (Greek: Ἑρμαγόρας ὁ Ἀμφιπολίτης) (3rd century BC) was a Stoic philosopher, student of Cypriot Persaeus, in the court of Antigonus II Gonatas. He wrote several dialogues, among...
Integrative psychotherapy
Integrative psychotherapy is the integration of elements from different schools of psychotherapy in the treatment of a patient. In this form of psychotherapy there is a focus on achieving greater leve...
Origins of Christianity
Early Christianity and Early Rabbinical Judaism were significantly influenced by Hellenistic religion and Hellenistic philosophy. Christianity in particular inherited many features of Greco-Roman pag...
Origins of Christianity - Wikipedia
Homonoia
Homonoia (Greek: Ὁμόνοια) is the concept of order and unity, being of one mind together or union of hearts. It was used by the Greeks to create unity in the politics of classical Greece. It saw w...
Homonoia - Wikipedia
Metakosmia
The metakosmia (Greek: μετακόσμια; Latin: intermundia), according to Epicurean philosophy were the relatively empty spaces in the infinite void where worlds had not been formed by the joining toge...