Koine Greek
Koine Greek (/ˈkɔɪniː/ or /ˈkɔɪneɪ/; from κοινός/κοινή "common", also known as Alexandrian dialect, common Attic or Hellenistic Greek) was the common supra-regional form of Greek spoken and written du...
Jewish Christianity
Jewish Christians, also Hebrew Christians or Judeo-Christians, were the original members of the Jewish movement that later became Christianity. In the earliest stage the community was made up of all t...
Greek Fathers
The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and generally influential Christian theologians, some of whom were eminent teachers and great bishops....
Greek Fathers - Wikipedia
Neoplatonic Academy
23°42′29″E / 37.99250°N 23.70806°E / 37.99250; 23.70806The Academy (Ancient Greek: Ἀκαδημία) was founded by Plato (428/427 BC – 348/347 BC) in ca. 387 BC in Athens. Aristotle ...
Neoplatonic Academy - Wikipedia
Justin's Hortatory Address to the Greeks
Justin Martyr, also known as Saint Justin (c. 100 – 165 AD), was an early Christian apologist, and is regarded as the foremost interpreter of the theory of the Logos in the 2nd century. He was m...
Justin's Hortatory Address to the Greeks - Wikipedia
Gemistus Pletho
Georgius Gemistus (Greek: Γεώργιος Γεμιστός; c. 1355 – 1452/1454), later called Plethon (/ˈpliːθɒn, -θən/) or Pletho (/ˈpliːθoʊ/; Πλήθων), was a Greek scholar of Neoplatonic philosophy. He w...
Gemistus Pletho - Wikipedia
Neoplatonism and Gnosticism
Neoplatonism (also Neo-Platonism) is the modern term for a school of Hellenistic philosophy that took shape in the 3rd century, based on the teachings of Plato and some of his early followers. Neopl...
Neoplatonism and Gnosticism - Wikipedia
Michael Servetus
Michael Servetus (/sərˈviːtəs/; Spanish: Miguel Serveto Conesa), also known as Miguel Servet, Miguel Serveto, Revés, or Michel de Villeneuve (29 September 1509 or 1511 – 27 October 1553), was...
Michael Servetus - Wikipedia
Josephus's Discourse to the Greeks concerning Hades
Josephus's Discourse to the Greeks concerning Hades is the anachronistic title of a short treatise published in the translation of Josephus by William Whiston. Erroneously attributed to the Jewish his...
Minuscule 57
Minuscule 57 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), δ 255 (Von Soden), is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment leaves. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 12th century....
Minuscule 57 - Wikipedia
Themistius
Themistius (Greek: Θεμίστιος, Themistios; 317, Paphlagonia – c. 390 AD, Constantinople), named εὐφραδής (eloquent), was a statesman, rhetorician, and philosopher. He flourished in the reigns of Consta...
Lectionary 179
Codex Sancti Simeonis, commonly known as Lectionary 179, designated by siglum ℓ 179 in the Gregory-Aland numbering, is a Greek manuscript of readings from the Old and New Testaments, written on parchm...
Lectionary 179 - Wikipedia
Paul the Apostle and Judaism
The relationship between Paul the Apostle and Second Temple Judaism continues to be the subject of much scholarly research, as it is thought that Paul played an important role in the relationship betw...
Paul the Apostle and Judaism - Wikipedia
Clement of Alexandria
Titus Flavius Clemens (Greek: Κλήμης ὁ Ἀλεξανδρεύς; c. 150 – c. 215), known as Clement of Alexandria to distinguish him from the earlier Clement of Rome, was a Christian theologian who taught at t...
Clement of Alexandria - Wikipedia
Synesius
Synesius (Greek: Συνέσιος; c. 373 – c. 414), a Greek bishop of Ptolemais in the Libyan Pentapolis after 410, was born of wealthy parents, who claimed descent from Spartan kings, at Balagrae (Bayda...
Hellenes (religion)
The Greeks (Greek: Έλληνες) have been identified by many ethnonyms. The most common native ethnonym is "Hellen" (Ἕλλην), pl. "Hellenes" (Ἕλληνες); the name "Greeks" (Latin: "Graeci") was used by ...
Hellenes (religion) - Wikipedia
Apollonius of Tyana
Apollonius of Tyana (Ancient Greek: Ἀπολλώνιος ὁ Τυανεύς; c. 15 – c. 100 CE) was a Greek Neopythagorean philosopher from the town of Tyana in the Roman province of Cappadocia in Asia Minor. Littl...
Apollonius of Tyana - Wikipedia
History of the Jews in the Roman Empire
The history of the Jews in the Roman Empire traces the interaction of Jews and Romans during the period of the Roman Empire (27 BC – AD 476). Jews, primarily from the Middle East, and Ancient Romans, ...
History of the Jews in the Roman Empire - Wikipedia
Tatian
Tatian the Assyrian (/ˈteɪʃən, -iən/; c. 120 – c. 180 AD) was an Assyrian early Christian writer and theologian of the 2nd century.Tatian's most influential work is the Diatessaron, a Biblical paraphr...
Tatian - Wikipedia
Papyrus 12
Papyrus 12 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), α 1033 (in the Soden numbering), designated by siglum , is an early copy of the New Testament in Greek. It is a papyrus manuscript of the Epistle to the H...
Papyrus 12 - Wikipedia
Minuscule 55
Minuscule 55 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ε 349 (Von Soden), is a Greek minuscule manuscript of the New Testament, on parchment leaves. Palaeographically it has been assigned to the 14th century....
Minuscule 55 - Wikipedia
Constantine I and Judaism
Under Constantine I Jewish clergy were given the same exemptions as Christian clergy. Constantine, however, supported the separation of the date of Easter from the Jewish Passover (see also Quartodeci...
Constantine I and Judaism - Wikipedia
Religious antisemitism
Religious antisemitism is a form of antisemitism, which is the prejudice against, or hostility toward, the Jewish people based on hostility to Judaism and to Jews as a religious group. It is sometimes...
Religious antisemitism - Wikipedia
Alastor
Alastor (/əˈlæstər, -tɔːr/; Greek: Ἀλάστωρ, English translation: "avenger") refers to a number of people and concepts in Greek mythology: