Hebrew Christians
Jewish Christians, also Hebrew Christians or Judeo-Christians, were the original members of the Jewish movement that later became Christianity. In the earliest stage the community was made up of all t...
Hebrew Christians - Wikipedia
Split of early Christianity and Judaism
The split of early Christianity and Judaism took place during the first centuries of the Common Era. It is commonly attributed to a number of events, including the rejection and crucifixion of Jesus (...
Split of early Christianity and Judaism - Wikipedia
Paul of Tarsus and Judaism
The relationship between Paul the Apostle and Second Temple Judaism continues to be the subject of much scholarly research, as it is thought that Paul played an important role in the relationship betw...
Paul of Tarsus and Judaism - Wikipedia
Circumcision controversy in early Christianity
The Early Christian Council of Jerusalem did not include religious male circumcision as a requirement for new gentile converts. This became known as the "Apostolic Decree" and may be one of the first ...
Circumcision controversy in early Christianity - Wikipedia
New Wine into Old Wineskins
New Wine into Old Wineskins is, according to the New Testament, one of a pair of parables told by Jesus. It is found at Matthew 9:14-17, Mark 2:21-22 and Luke 5:33-39. A version of the parable also ap...
New Wine into Old Wineskins - Wikipedia
Jesus in the Talmud
The Talmud contains passages that some scholars have concluded are references to Christian traditions about Jesus. The history of textual transmission of these passages is complex and scholars are not...
Jesus in the Talmud - Wikipedia
Quartodecimanism
Quartodecimanism (from the Vulgate Latin quarta decima in Leviticus 23:5, meaning fourteenth) refers to the custom of early Christians celebrating Passover beginning with the eve of the 14th day of Ni...
Historical background of New Testament
Most scholars who study the Historical Jesus and Early Christianity believe that the Canonical Gospels and life of Jesus must be viewed as firmly placed within his historical and cultural context, ra...
Historical background of New Testament - Wikipedia
James the Just
James (Hebrew: יעקב Ya'akov; Greek Ἰάκωβος Iákōbos, also could be anglicized as Jacob), who died in martyrdom in 62 or 69 AD, was an important figure of the Apostolic Age. His usual epithets are James...
Marcion of Sinope
Marcion of Sinope (/ˈmɑrʃən, -ʃiən, -siən/; Greek: Μαρκίων Σινώπης; c. 85 – c. 160) was an important leader in early Christianity. His theology rejected the deity described in the Hebrew Scriptu...
Marcion of Sinope - Wikipedia
Sanhedrin trial of Jesus
The Sanhedrin trial of Jesus refers to the trial of Jesus before the Sanhedrin (a Jewish judicial body) following his arrest in Jerusalem and prior to his dispensation by Pontius Pilate. It is an even...
Sanhedrin trial of Jesus - Wikipedia
Elcesaites
The Elcesaites, Elkasaites, Elkesaites, or Elchasaites were an ancient Jewish-Christian basing their origin from the Book of Elchasai. The sect is possibly related to the Ebionites, in Sassanid south...
God-fearer
A God-fearer or Godfearer was a member of a class of non-Jewish (gentile) sympathizers to Second Temple Judaism mentioned in the Christian New Testament and other contemporary sources such as synagogu...
Paul the Apostle and Judaism
The relationship between Paul the Apostle and Second Temple Judaism continues to be the subject of much scholarly research, as it is thought that Paul played an important role in the relationship betw...
Paul the Apostle and Judaism - Wikipedia
Biblical Sabbath
Biblical Sabbath is a weekly day of rest or time of worship. It is observed differently in Judaism and Christianity and informs a similar occasion in several other faiths. Though many viewpoints and d...
Biblical Sabbath - Wikipedia
Ebionites
Ebionites, or Ebionaioi (Greek: Ἐβιωναῖοι; derived from Hebrew אביונים ebyonim, ebionim, meaning "the poor" or "poor ones"), is a patristic term referring to a Jewish Christian movement that existed ...
Ebionites - Wikipedia
Ebion
Ebion (Greek: Εβιων) was the presumed eponymous founder of an early Christian group known as the Ebionites. The existent historical evidence indicates that the name "Ebionite" is derived from a Hebrew...
Gilyonim
Gilyonim is a term used by Jewish scribes flourishing between 100 and 135 CE to denote the Gospels.
The designation as used by them did not imply any mockery; Rabbi Meïr, who flourished after 135,...
Pauline Christianity
Pauline Christianity is the Christianity associated with the beliefs and doctrines espoused by Paul the Apostle through his writings. Most of Christianity relies heavily on these teachings and conside...
Christianity in the 2nd century
Christianity in the 2nd century was largely the time of the Apostolic Fathers who were the students of the apostles of Jesus, though there is some overlap as John the Apostle may have survived into ...
Christianity in the 2nd century - Wikipedia
Judaism's view of Jesus
Judaism generally views Jesus as one of a number of Jewish Messiah claimants who have appeared throughout history. Jesus is viewed as having been the most influential, and consequently the most damagi...
Birkat haMinim
The Birkat ha-Minim (Hebrew ברכת המינים "Blessing on the heretics") is a Jewish prayer of blessing on heretics in general, and sometimes Christians, though in this context "blessing" may also be a eu...
Legalism (theology)
Legalism, in Christian theology, is a usually pejorative term referring to an over-emphasis on discipline of conduct, or legal ideas, usually implying an allegation of misguided rigour, pride, superf...
Slavonic Josephus
Slavonic Josephus refers to a set of manuscripts that were once attributed to the ancient historian Flavius Josephus, but have since been mostly discredited. Josephus wrote all of his surviving works ...
Slavonic Josephus - Wikipedia
Hellenistic Judaism
Hellenistic Judaism was a form of Judaism in the ancient world that combined Jewish religious tradition with elements of Greek culture. Until the fall of the Roman Empire and the Muslim conquests of t...
Hellenistic Judaism - Wikipedia
Society for the Study of Early Christianity
The Society for the Study of Early Christianity is a professional association of ancient historians and Biblical scholars, established within the Ancient Cultures Research Centre (ACRC) at Macquarie U...
Physician, heal thyself
Physician, heal thyself (Ἰατρέ, θεράπευσον σεαυτόν) is a proverb found in Luke 4:23.The usual interpretation of this passage is that, during the Rejection of Jesus, Jesus expected to hear natives of h...
Christianity in the 3rd century
Christianity in the 3rd century was largely the time of the Ante-Nicene Fathers who wrote after the Apostolic Fathers of the 1st and 2nd centuries but before the First Council of Nicaea in 325 (ante-n...
Christianity in the 3rd century - Wikipedia
New Perspective on Paul
The new perspective on Paul is a significant shift in the way some scholars, especially Protestant scholars, interpret the writings of the Apostle Paul.Paul, especially in his Epistle to the Romans, a...
Gamaliel
Gamaliel the Elder (/ɡəˈmeɪljəl/; also spelled Gamliel; Hebrew: רבן גמליאל הזקן; Greek: Γαμαλιὴλ ὁ Πρεσβύτερος) or Rabban Gamaliel I, was a leading authority in the Sanhedrin in the early 1st century ...
Gamaliel - Wikipedia
Didache
The Didache (/ˈdɪdəkiː/; Koine Greek: Διδαχή) or The Teaching of the Twelve Apostles (Didachē means "Teaching") is a brief early Christian treatise, dated by most scholars to the late first or early 2...
Didache - Wikipedia