Evidence (law)
The law of evidence encompasses the rules and legal principles that govern the proof of facts in a legal proceeding. These rules determine what evidence must or must not be considered by the trier of...
How Long Can a Cop Keep You After a Traffic Stop? No One's Sure
One of the murkiest areas in Fourth Amendment law. The police are forbidden from conducting searches and seizures without a warrant or probable cause. So they just ask for your permission to conduct a...
Lies (evidence)
Lies, on their own, are not sufficient evidence of a crime though in some situations they may themselves be a crime—making false statements, fraud, false advertising, perjury. However, lies may indica...
Eyewitness
Eyewitness or Eye witness may refer to:
Forensic identification
Forensic identification is the application of forensic science, or "forensics", and technology to identify specific objects from the trace evidence they leave, often at a crime scene or the scene of a...
Forensic identification - Wikipedia
Hearsay
Hearsay evidence is "an out-of-court statement introduced to prove the truth of the matter asserted therein." In certain courts hearsay evidence is inadmissible (the "Hearsay Evidence Rule") unless ...
Hearsay - Wikipedia
Privilege (evidence)
An evidentiary privilege is a rule of evidence that allows the holder of the privilege to refuse to provide evidence about a certain subject or to bar such evidence from being disclosed or used in a j...
Search and seizure
Search and seizure is a procedure used in many civil law and common law legal systems whereby police or other authorities and their agents, who suspect that a crime has been committed, do a search of ...
Search and seizure - Wikipedia
Testimony
In law and in religion, testimony is a solemn attestation as to the truth of a matter.
The words "testimony" and "testify" both have a root in the Latin testis, referring to the notion of a third ...
Testimony - Wikipedia
United States evidence law
The following outline of evidence law in the United States sets forth the areas of contention that generally arise in the presentation of evidence in trial proceedings.
Chain of custody
Chain of custody (CoC), in legal contexts, refers to the chronological documentation or paper trail, showing the seizure, custody, control, transfer, analysis, and disposition of physical or electroni...
Hostile witness
A hostile witness, otherwise known as an adverse witness or an unfavorable witness, is a witness at trial whose testimony on direct examination is either openly antagonistic or appears to be contrary...
Outline of evidence law in the United States
The following outline of evidence law in the United States sets forth the areas of contention that generally arise in the presentation of evidence in trial proceedings.
Pseudoscience
Pseudoscience is a claim, belief or practice which is falsely presented as scientific, but does not adhere to a valid scientific method, cannot be reliably tested, or otherwise lacks scientific status...
Prior consistent statements and prior inconsistent statements
Prior consistent statements and prior inconsistent statements, in the law of evidence, occur where a witness, testifying at trial, makes a statement that is either consistent or inconsistent, respecti...
Wigmore chart
A Wigmore chart (commonly referred to as Wigmorean analysis) is a graphical method for the analysis of legal evidence in trials, developed by John Henry Wigmore. It is an early form of the modern beli...
Conclusive presumption
A conclusive presumption (also known as an irrebuttable presumption) is a type of presumption used in several legal systems.
In English law, a conclusive presumption is a presumption of law that c...
Incontrovertible evidence
Incontrovertible evidence is a colloquial term for evidence introduced to prove a fact that is supposed to be so conclusive that there can be no other truth as to the matter; evidence so strong it ove...
Judicial notice
Judicial notice is a rule in the law of evidence that allows a fact to be introduced into evidence if the truth of that fact is so notorious or well known, or so authoritatively attested, that it cann...
Indian Evidence Act
The Indian Evidence Act, originally passed by the Imperial Legislative Council in 1872, during the British Raj, contains a set of rules and allied issues governing admissibility of evidence in the Ind...
No case to answer
No case for the defendant to answer (sometimes shortened to no case to answer) is a term in British criminal law, whereby a defendant seeks acquittal without having to present a defence.At the close o...
Surrebuttal
In an adversarial process, for instance a court proceeding, a surrebuttal is a response to the opposing party's rebuttal; in essence it is a rebuttal to a rebuttal.
Provenance
Provenance (from the French provenir, "to come from"), is the chronology of the ownership, custody or location of a historical object. The term was originally mostly used in relation to works of art, ...
Provenance - Wikipedia
Reverse onus
A reverse onus clause is a provision within a statute that shifts the burden of proof onto the individual specified to disprove an element of the information. Typically, this provision concerns a shif...
Self-incrimination
Self-incrimination is the act of exposing oneself (generally, by making a statement) "to an accusation or charge of crime; to involve oneself or another [person] in a criminal prosecution or the dange...
How Long Can a Cop Keep You After a Traffic Stop? No One's Sure
One of the murkiest areas in Fourth Amendment law. The police are forbidden from conducting searches and seizures without a warrant or probable cause. So they just ask for your permission to conduct a...