Apollo of Veii
The Apollo of Veii is an over-life-size painted terracotta Etruscan statue of Apollo (Aplu). Originally at Veii, it dates from c. 510 - 500 BC and was sculpted in the so-called "international" Ionic ...
Bucchero
Bucchero ([bukkero]) is a class of ceramics produced in central Italy by the region's pre-Roman Etruscan population. This Italian word is derived from the Latin poculum, a drinking-vessel, perhaps th...
Bucchero - Wikipedia
Etruscan terracotta warriors
The Etruscan terracotta warriors are three statues that resemble the work of the ancient Etruscans, but are in fact art forgeries. The statues, created by Italian brothers Pio and Alfonso Riccardi and...
Sarcophagus of the Spouses
The Sarcophagus of the Spouses (Italian: Sarcofago degli Sposi) is a late 6th century BC Etruscan anthropoid sarcophagus. It is 1.14 m high by 1.9 m wide, and is made of terracotta which...
Sarcophagus of the Spouses - Wikipedia
Tabula Capuana
The Tabula Capuana (Tegola di Capua, Etruscophiles like to call it), now conserved in Berlin, represents the second most extensive surviving Etruscan text, after the linen book the (Liber Linteus) use...
Vulca
Vulca was an Etruscan artist from the town of Veii. The only Etruscan artist mentioned by ancient writers, he worked for the last of the Roman kings, Tarquinius Superbus. He is responsible for creatin...
Sarcophagus of Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa
The Sarcophagus of Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa is the life-size sarcophagus of an Etruscan noblewoman dating from between 150-140 BC. Since 1887, it has been part of the British Museum's collection.
Sarcophagus of Seianti Hanunia Tlesnasa - Wikipedia
Mamarce Oinochoe
The Mamarce Oinochoe is an Etruscan vessel of art historical significance which is dated to around 640/20 BC. Today the oinochoe is kept in Martin von Wagner Museum in Würzburg, where it has the inven...
Mamarce Oinochoe - Wikipedia
Impasto (pottery)
Impasto is a type of coarse Etruscan pottery. The defining characteristic is that the clay contains chips of mica or stone.In G.A. Mansuelli's, The Art of Etruria and Early Rome (1964), the term "impa...