Effect size
In statistics, an effect size is a quantitative measure of the strength of a phenomenon. Examples of effect sizes are the correlation between two variables, the regression coefficient, the mean differ...
Phi coefficient
In statistics, the phi coefficient (also referred to as the "mean square contingency coefficient" and denoted by φ (or rφ)) is a measure of association for two binary variables. Introduced by Karl Pea...
Cramér's V (statistics)
In statistics, Cramér's V (sometimes referred to as Cramér's phi and denoted as φc) is a measure of association between two nominal variables, giving a value between 0 and +1 (inclusive). It is based...
Strictly standardized mean difference
In statistics, the strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD) is a measure of effect size. SSMD is the mean divided by the standard deviation of a difference between two random values each from one ...
Z-factor
The Z-factor is a measure of statistical effect size. It has been proposed for use in high-throughput screening (where it is also known as Z-prime, and commonly written as Z') to judge whether the re...
Standardized mean of a contrast variable
In statistics, the standardized mean of a contrast variable (SMCV or SMC), is a parameter assessing effect size. The SMCV is defined as mean divided by the standard deviation of a contrast variable. T...