Early Christianity and Judaism
The split of early Christianity and Judaism took place during the first centuries of the Common Era. It is commonly attributed to a number of events, including the rejection and crucifixion of Jesus (...
Early Christianity and Judaism - Wikipedia
Jewish messianism
Messiah (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ‎; mashiah, moshiah, mashiach, or moshiach, "anointed [one]") is a term used in the Hebrew Bible to describe priests and kings, who were traditionally anointed with holy...
Rejection of Jesus
The New Testament includes a number of incidents of the rejection of Jesus during his lifetime, by local communities and individuals.
In the sixth chapter of the Gospel of Mark there is an account...
Rejection of Jesus - Wikipedia
Conversion of Paul
The Conversion of Paul the Apostle, was, according to the New Testament, an event in the life of Paul the Apostle that led him to cease persecuting early Christians and to become a follower of Jesus. ...
Conversion of Paul - Wikipedia
Gamaliel
Gamaliel the Elder (/ɡəˈmeɪljəl/; also spelled Gamliel; Hebrew: רבן גמליאל הזקן; Greek: Γαμαλιὴλ ὁ Πρεσβύτερος) or Rabban Gamaliel I, was a leading authority in the Sanhedrin in the early 1st century ...
Gamaliel - Wikipedia
Christian views on the old covenant
The "Old Covenant", also referred to as the Mosaic covenant, the Law of Moses, divine law, Biblical law or God's Law, refers to the religious law codified in the first five books (Pentateuch) of the O...
Christian views on the old covenant - Wikipedia
First Jewish-Roman War
The First Jewish–Roman War (66–73 CE), sometimes called The Great Revolt (Hebrew: המרד הגדול‎, ha-Mered Ha-Gadol, Latin: Primum populi Romani bellum in Iudaeos), was the first of three major...
First Jewish-Roman War - Wikipedia
Origins of Rabbinic Judaism
Rabbinic Judaism or Rabbinism has been the mainstream form of Judaism since the 6th century, after the codification of the Talmud. Rabbinic Judaism gained predominance within the Jewish diaspora betwe...
Origins of Rabbinic Judaism - Wikipedia
Origins of Christianity
Early Christianity and Early Rabbinical Judaism were significantly influenced by Hellenistic religion and Hellenistic philosophy. Christianity in particular inherited many features of Greco-Roman pag...
Origins of Christianity - Wikipedia
Marcion of Sinope
Marcion of Sinope (/ˈmɑrʃən, -ʃiən, -siən/; Greek: Μαρκίων Σινώπης; c. 85 – c. 160) was an important leader in early Christianity. His theology rejected the deity described in the Hebrew Scriptu...
Marcion of Sinope - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 1st century
Christianity in the 1st century deals with the formative years of the Early Christian community. The earliest followers of Jesus composed an apocalyptic Jewish sect, which historians refer to as Jewi...
Christianity in the 1st century - Wikipedia
Christianity in the 2nd century
Christianity in the 2nd century was largely the time of the Apostolic Fathers who were the students of the apostles of Jesus, though there is some overlap as John the Apostle may have survived into ...
Christianity in the 2nd century - Wikipedia
Hellenistic Judaism
Hellenistic Judaism was a form of Judaism in the ancient world that combined Jewish religious tradition with elements of Greek culture. Until the fall of the Roman Empire and the Muslim conquests of t...
Hellenistic Judaism - Wikipedia
Philo
Philo of Alexandria (/ˈfaɪloʊ/; Greek: Φίλων, Philōn; c. 25 BCE – c. 50 CE), also called Philo Judaeus, was a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher who lived in Alexandria, in the Roman province of Egypt.Phi...
Philo - Wikipedia
Alexander the Alabarch
Alexander the Alabarch (c. 10 BC – unknown AD) was an Alexandrian Jewish aristocrat. His brother was the exegete and philosopher Philo of Alexandria.
Alexander's family lived in Alexandria, Egypt....
Marcus Julius Alexander
Marcus Julius Alexander (flourished 1st century, died before August 44) was a distinguished and wealthy Alexandrian Jewish Merchant.
Marcus was born and raised in Alexandria, Egypt. He was either ...
Josephus on Jesus
The extant manuscripts of the writings of the 1st-century Romano-Jewish historian Flavius Josephus include references to Jesus and the origins of Christianity. Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews, writt...
Josephus on Jesus - Wikipedia
Tetragrammaton in the New Testament
The Tetragrammaton (Greek: τετραγραμματον, "four letters") is the quadriliteral, typically unvocalized, Hebrew theonym יהוה identifying the God of Israel throughout the Hebrew Bible, composed of the H...
Ministry of Jesus
In the Christian gospels, the ministry of Jesus begins with his baptism in the countryside of Roman Judea and Transjordan, near the river Jordan, and ends in Jerusalem, following the Last Supper with ...
Ministry of Jesus - Wikipedia
Son of man
"Son of man" is a phrase used in the Hebrew Bible, various apocalyptic works of the inter-testamental period, and the Greek New Testament. In the indefinite form ("son of man", "one like a son of man"...
Son of man - Wikipedia
Quartodecimanism
Quartodecimanism (from the Vulgate Latin quarta decima in Leviticus 23:5, meaning fourteenth) refers to the custom of early Christians celebrating Passover beginning with the eve of the 14th day of Ni...
Domus Conversorum
The Domus Conversorum (House of the Converts) was a building and institution in London for Jews who had converted to Christianity. It provided a communal home and low wages. It was needed because all...
Paul the Apostle and Judaism
The relationship between Paul the Apostle and Second Temple Judaism continues to be the subject of much scholarly research, as it is thought that Paul played an important role in the relationship betw...
Paul the Apostle and Judaism - Wikipedia
Persecution of Christians in the New Testament
The persecution of Christians in the New Testament is an important part of the Early Christian narrative which depicts the early Church as being persecuted for their heterodox beliefs by a Jewish esta...
Legalism (theology)
Legalism, in Christian theology, is a usually pejorative term referring to an over-emphasis on discipline of conduct, or legal ideas, usually implying an allegation of misguided rigour, pride, superf...
Epistle of Barnabas
The Epistle of Barnabas (Greek: Επιστολή Βαρνάβα, Hebrew: איגרת בארנבס‎) is a Greek epistle containing twenty-one chapters, preserved complete in the 4th century Codex Sinaiticus where it ap...
Dual-covenant theology
Dual-covenant theology is a Christian view of the Old Covenant which holds that Jews may simply keep the "Law of Moses", because of the "everlasting covenant" (Genesis 17:13) between Abraham and God ...
Ebionites
Ebionites, or Ebionaioi (Greek: Ἐβιωναῖοι; derived from Hebrew אביונים ebyonim, ebionim, meaning "the poor" or "poor ones"), is a patristic term referring to a Jewish Christian movement that existed ...
Ebionites - Wikipedia