Development of the New Testament canon
The canon of the New Testament is the set of books Christians regard as divinely inspired and constituting the New Testament of the Christian Bible. For most, it is an agreed-upon list of twenty-seven...
Development of the New Testament canon - Wikipedia
On October 24th 1648, The Treaty Of Westphalia Was Signed, Marking The End Of The Thirty Years War.
The Westphalia area of north-western Germany gave its name to the treaty that ended the Thirty Years War, one of the most destructive conflicts in the history of Europe. The war or series of connected...
Protestant Reformation
The Protestant Reformation - Part 1.
Protestantism
The Protestant Reformation - Part 1.
Early Christianity
Early Christianity is the period of Christianity preceding the First Council of Nicaea in 325. It is typically divided into the Apostolic Age and the Ante-Nicene Period (from the Apostolic Age until N...
Early Christianity - Wikipedia
History of early Christianity
The history of early Christianity covers Christianity from its origins to the First Council of Nicaea in 325.The first part of the period, during the lifetimes of the Twelve Apostles, is traditionally...
History of early Christianity - Wikipedia
Marcion of Sinope
Marcion of Sinope (/ˈmɑrʃən, -ʃiən, -siən/; Greek: Μαρκίων Σινώπης; c. 85 – c. 160) was an important leader in early Christianity. His theology rejected the deity described in the Hebrew Scriptu...
Marcion of Sinope - Wikipedia
Canonical gospels
A gospel is an account describing the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth. The most widely known examples are the four canonical gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, but the term ...
Canonical gospels - Wikipedia
Diatessaron
The Diatessaron (c. 160–175) is the most prominent early Gospel harmony; and was created by Tatian, an early Christian Assyrian apologist and ascetic. Tatian sought to combine all the textual materia...
Diatessaron - Wikipedia
Gospel harmony
A Gospel harmony is an attempt to compile the Christian canonical gospels into a single account. This may take the form either of a single, merged narrative, or a tabular format with one column for ea...
Gospel harmony - Wikipedia
Christian heresy
When heresy is used today with reference to Christianity, it denotes the formal denial or doubt of a core doctrine of the Christian faith as defined by one or more of the Christian churches. It should...
Christian heresy - Wikipedia
Muratorian fragment
The Muratorian fragment is a copy of perhaps the oldest known list of the books of the New Testament. The fragment, consisting of 85 lines, is a 7th-century Latin manuscript bound in a 7th or 8th cent...
Muratorian fragment - Wikipedia
Alogi
The Alogi (ἄλογοι, also called "Alogians") were a group of heterodox Christians in Asia Minor that flourished around 170 CE. What we know of them is derived from their doctrinal opponents, whose liter...
First seven Ecumenical Councils
In the history of Christianity, the first seven ecumenical councils, from the First Council of Nicaea (325) to the Second Council of Nicaea (787), represented an attempt to reach an orthodox consensus...
First seven Ecumenical Councils - Wikipedia
Codex Claromontanus
Codex Claromontanus, symbolized by D or 06 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), δ 1026 (von Soden), is a Greek-Latin diglot uncial manuscript of the New Testament, written in an uncial hand on vellum. Th...
Codex Claromontanus - Wikipedia
Fifty Bibles of Constantine
The Fifty Bibles of Constantine were Bibles in Greek language commissioned in 331 by Constantine I and prepared by Eusebius of Caesarea. They were made for the use of the Bishop of Constantinople in t...
Fifty Bibles of Constantine - Wikipedia
Synod of Laodicea
The Council of Laodicea was a regional synod of approximately thirty clerics from Asia Minor that assembled about 363–364 AD in Laodicea, Phrygia Pacatiana.
The council took place soon after the c...
Orthodox Christianity
Orthodox Christianity is a collective term for the Eastern Orthodox Church and Oriental Orthodoxy. Each of these two branches of Christianity uses the term "orthodoxy" (from Greek: orthos + doxa, ...
Orthodox Christianity - Wikipedia
Peshitta
The Peshitta (Classical Syriac: ܦܫܝܛܬܐ pšîṭtâ) is the standard version of the Bible for churches in the Syriac tradition.The general, but not universal, consensus is that the Old Testament of the ...
Peshitta - Wikipedia
Aramaic primacy
The Aramaic New Testament exists in two forms: (1) the classical Aramaic, or Syriac, New Testament, part of the Peshitta Bible; (2) the "Assyrian Modern" New Testament and Psalms, published by the Bib...
Protestant Reformation
The Protestant Reformation, often referred to simply as the Reformation, was the schism within Western Christianity initiated by Martin Luther, John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli and other early Protestant...
Protestant Reformation - Wikipedia
Lutheran canon
Luther's canon is the biblical canon attributed to Martin Luther, which has influenced Protestants since the 16th-century Protestant Reformation. While the Lutheran Confessions specifically did not de...
Sola scriptura
Sola scriptura (Latin ablative, "by Scripture alone") is the Protestant Christian doctrine that the Bible is the supreme authority in all matters of doctrine and practice. Sola scriptura does not deny...
Sola scriptura - Wikipedia
On October 24th 1648, The Treaty Of Westphalia Was Signed, Marking The End Of The Thirty Years War.
The Westphalia area of north-western Germany gave its name to the treaty that ended the Thirty Years War, one of the most destructive conflicts in the history of Europe. The war or series of connected...
Biblical apocrypha
The Biblical apocrypha (from the Greek ἀπόκρυφος, apókruphos, meaning "hidden") denotes the collection of ancient books found, in some editions of the Bible, in a separate section between the Old and ...
On the Freedom of a Christian
On the Freedom of a Christian, sometimes also called "A Treatise on Christian Liberty" (German: "Von der Freiheit eines Christenmenschen") (November 1520), was the third of Martin Luther’s major refor...
Alexandru Lăpușneanu
Alexandru Lăpușneanu was Prince of Moldavia between September 1552 and 18 November 1561 and then between October 1564 and 5 May 1568. His wife and consort was Doamna Ruxandra Lăpușneanu, the daughter ...
Alexandru Lăpușneanu - Wikipedia
Pope Sixtus V
Pope Sixtus V or Xystus V (13 December 1521 – 27 August 1590), born Felice Peretti di Montalto, was Pope from 24 April 1585 to his death in 1590. To date, he is the last pontiff to take the pontifical...
Pope Sixtus V - Wikipedia
Spirituali
The Spirituali were members of a reform movementwithin the Roman Catholic Church, which existed from the 1510s to the 1560s. The ranks of the Spirituali included Cardinal Gasparo Contarini (1483–1542)...
The Pilgrim's Tale
The Pilgrim's Tale is an English anti-monastic poem. It was probably written ca. 1536–38, since it makes references to events in 1534 and 1536 – i.e., the Lincolnshire Rebellion – and borrows from The...