Greek underworld
The Greek underworld, in mythology, was a place where souls went after death and was the Greek idea of afterlife. At the moment of death the soul was separated from the corpse, taking on the shape of ...
Chariot Allegory
Plato, in his dialogue Phaedrus (sections 246a–254e), uses the Chariot Allegory to explain his view of the human soul. He does this in the dialogue through the character of Socrates, who uses it in a ...
Acherusia
In Greek mythology, Acherusia (Greek: 'Αχερουσια λιμνη or 'Αχερουσις), was a name given by the ancients to several lakes or swamps, which, like the various rivers called Acheron, were at some time...
Peregrinus Proteus
Peregrinus Proteus (Greek: Περεγρῖνος Πρωτεύς; c. 95 – 165 AD) was a Greek Cynic philosopher, from Parium in Mysia. Leaving home at a young age, he first lived with the Christians in Palestine, before...
Metaphysics (Aristotle)
Metaphysics (Greek: τὰ μετὰ τὰ φυσικά; Latin: Metaphysica) is one of the principal works of Aristotle and the first major work of the branch of philosophy with the same name. The principal subject is ...
Myth of Er
The Myth of Er is a legend that concludes Plato's Republic (10.614–10.621). The story includes an account of the cosmos and the afterlife that greatly influenced religious, philosophical, and scientif...
Persephone
In Greek mythology, Persephone (/pərˈsɛfəniː/, per-SEH-fə-nee; Greek: Περσεφόνη), also called Kore (/ˈkɔəriː/; "the maiden"), is the daughter of Zeus and the harvest goddess Demeter, and is the qu...
Castor and Pollux
In Greek and Roman mythology, Castor and Pollux or Polydeuces were twin brothers, together known as the Dioskouri. Their mother was Leda, but Castor was the mortal son of Tyndareus, the king of Sparta...
Shade (mythology)
In literature and poetry, a shade (translating Greek σκιά, Latin umbra) can be taken to mean the spirit or ghost of a dead person, residing in the underworld.The image of an underworld where the dead...
List of works by Lucian
A list of works by Lucian of Samosata (c. AD 125 – after AD 180), who wrote in Ancient Greek.The order of the works is that of the Oxford Classical Texts edition. The English titles are taken from Loe...
Hades
Hades (/ˈheɪdiːz/; from Ancient Greek Ἅιδης/ᾍδης) was the ancient Greek god of the underworld. Eventually, the god's name came to designate the abode of the dead. In Greek mythology, Hades is the old...
Eurynomos
In Greek mythology, Eurynomos (/jʊˈrɪnəməs/; Greek Εὐρύνομος; Latin Eurynomus) was the netherworld daimon (spirit) of rotting corpses dwelling in the Underworld. Eurynomos is either a minor figure who...
Charon's obol
Charon's obol is an allusive term for the coin placed in or on the mouth of a dead person before burial. Greek and Latin literary sources specify the coin as an obol, and explain it as a payment or br...
Nekyia
In ancient Greek cult-practice and literature, a nekyia (Ancient Greek: ἡ νέκυια) is a "rite by which ghosts were called up and questioned about the future," i.e., necromancy. A nekyia is not nec...
Ancient Greek funeral and burial practices
Ancient Greek funerary practices are attested widely in the literature, the archaeological record, and the art of ancient Greece. Finds associated with burials are an important source for ancient Gree...
Metempsychosis
Metempsychosis (Greek: μετεμψύχωσις) is a philosophical term in the Greek language referring to transmigration of the soul, especially its reincarnation after death. Generally, the term is only used w...
Cleombrotus of Ambracia
Cleombrotus (later referred to as Cleombrotus of Ambracia; Greek: Κλεόμβροτος) is a young man mentioned in Plato's Phaedo as one of two young men notably absent when Socrates drank the hemlock. Th...
Cerberus
Cerberus (/ˈsɜrbərəs/; Greek: Κέρβερος Kerberos [ˈkerberos]) in Greek and Roman mythology, is a multi-headed (usually three-headed) dog, or "hellhound" with a serpent's tail, a mane of snakes, and a ...
Somnium Scipionis
The Dream of Scipio (Latin, Somnium Scipionis), written by Cicero, is the sixth book of De re publica, and describes a fictional dream vision of the Roman general Scipio Aemilianus, set two years befo...
Anamnesis (philosophy)
In philosophy, anamnesis (/ˌænæmˈniːsɪs/; Ancient Greek: ἀνάμνησις) is a concept in Plato's epistemological and psychological theory that he develops in his dialogues Meno and Phaedo, and alludes...
Aornum
Aornum (Ancient Greek: Ἄορνον) was an oracle in Ancient Greece, located in Thesprotia in a cave called Charonium (Χαρώνειον ἄντρον or χάσμα) which gave forth poisonous vapours. The name of the cave, "...
Reincarnation
Reincarnation is the religious or philosophical concept that the soul or spirit, after biological death, can begin a new life in a new body. This doctrine is a central tenet of the Indian religions. I...
Phaedrus (dialogue)
The Phaedrus (/ˈfiːdrəs/; Greek: Φαῖδρος), written by Plato, is a dialogue between Plato's main protagonist, Socrates, and Phaedrus, an interlocutor in several dialogues. The Phaedrus was presumab...