Fireman's rule
The fireman's rule (firefighter's rule) also known as the professional rescuers rule is a common law or statutory restriction on tort actions by public safety officials. In general, the fireman's rule...
Saunders v Vautier
Saunders v Vautier (1841) EWHC Ch J82 is a leading English trusts law case. It laid down the rule of equity which provides that, if all of the beneficiaries in the trust are of adult age and under no ...
Money had and received
Money had and received is the name for a common law action for a claimant to have money returned to him if he had "had" it before, and then was "received" by someone else, without any justification.Th...
Rule in Dearle v Hall
The rule in Dearle v Hall (1828) 3 Russ 1 is an English common law rule to determine priority between competing equitable claims to the same asset. The rule broadly provides that where the equitable ...
Rule in Dumpor's Case
The Rule in Dumpor's Case is a common law rule of property law first set forth by Sir Edward Coke in 1578 (4 Coke 1196 [1578]). In its most basic form, it states that once a landlord has consented to...
Satisfaction of legacies
Ademption by satisfaction, also known as satisfaction of legacies, is a common law doctrine that determines the disposition of property under a will when the testator has made lifetime gifts to benefi...
Nullum tempus occurrit regi
Nullum tempus occurrit regi ("no time runs against the king"), sometimes abbreviated nullum tempus, is a common law doctrine originally expressed by Bracton in his De legibus et consuetudinibus Anglia...
English trusts law
English trust law concerns the creation and protection of asset funds, which are usually held by one person for someone else's benefit. Trusts were a creation of the English law of property and obliga...
English trusts law - Wikipedia
Plain meaning rule
The plain meaning rule, also known as the literal rule, is one of three rules of statutory construction traditionally applied by English courts. The other two are the “mischief rule” and the “golden r...
Rule in Allhusen v Whittell
Allhusen v. Whitell (1867) LR 4 Eq 295 is an English trusts law case which lays down a rule of equity which requires the trustee of a trust to strike a fair balance between the beneficiaries who are t...
English unjust enrichment law
English unjust enrichment law is part of the English law of obligations, alongside contract and tort, and property. A claim in unjust enrichment requires benefits that have been obtained by someone to...
Mozambique rule
The Moçambique rule, or (to adopt an anglicised form of spelling) Mozambique rule, is a common law rule in private international law. The rule renders actions relating to title in foreign land, the r...
Rule in Shelley's Case
The Rule in Shelley's Case is a rule of law that may apply to certain future interests in real property and trusts created in common law jurisdictions. It was applied as early as 1366 in The Provost ...
Ex turpi causa non oritur actio
Ex turpi causa non oritur actio (Latin for "from a dishonorable cause an action does not arise") is a legal doctrine which states that a plaintiff will be unable to pursue legal remedy if it arises in...
Devaynes v Noble
Devaynes v Noble (1816) 35 ER 781, best known for the claim contained in Clayton's case, created a rule, or rather common law presumption in relation to the distribution of monies from a bank account....
Devaynes v Noble - Wikipedia
Rule in Wild's Case
The Rule in Wild's Case is a common law rule of construction dating back to 1599 concerning a particular type of ambiguity in devises (such as grants or bequests) of real property: If a grantor (O) g...
Perpetuities and Accumulations Act 2009
The Perpetuities and Accumulations Act 2009 (c. 18) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that reforms the rule against perpetuities.The Act resulted from a Law Commission report published...
Rule against perpetuities
The common law rule against perpetuities forbids some future interests (traditionally contingent remainders and executory interests) that may not vest within the time permitted; the rule "limit[s] the...
Royal British Bank v Turquand
Royal British Bank v Turquand (1856) 6 E&B 327 is a UK company law case that held people transacting with companies are entitled to assume that internal company rules are complied with, even if th...
Ignorantia juris non excusat
Ignorantia juris non excusat or ignorantia legis neminem excusat (Latin for "ignorance of the law does not excuse" or "ignorance of the law excuses no one") is a legal principle holding that a person...
Strict constructionism
In the United States, strict constructionism refers to a particular legal philosophy of judicial interpretation that limits or restricts judicial interpretation.
Strict construction requires a jud...
Associated Provincial Picture Houses v Wednesbury Corporation
Associated Provincial Picture Houses Ltd. v Wednesbury Corporation [1948] 1 KB 223 is an English law case that sets out the standard of unreasonableness of public-body decisions that would make them l...
Associated Provincial Picture Houses v Wednesbury Corporation - Wikipedia
Howe v Earl of Dartmouth
Howe v Earl of Dartmouth (1802) 7 Ves 137 is an English trusts law case. It laid down the rule of equity in relation to the duties of a trustee in relation to a trust fund where there are successive i...
Year and a day rule
The year and a day rule has been a common length of time for establishing differences in legal status.The phrase "year and a day rule" is associated with the former common law standard that death coul...
Illustrations of the rule against perpetuities
The fertile octogenarian and the unborn widow are two legal fictions from the law of real property (and trusts) that can be used either to invoke the rule against perpetuities to make an interest in p...
Illustrations of the rule against perpetuities - Wikipedia
English contract law
English contract law is a body of law regulating contracts in England and Wales. With its roots in the lex mercatoria and the activism of the judiciary during the industrial revolution, it shares a he...
English contract law - Wikipedia
English tort law
English tort law concerns civil wrongs, as distinguished from criminal wrongs, in the law of England and Wales. Some wrongs are the concern of the state, and so the police can enforce the law on the w...
English tort law - Wikipedia
Illegality in English law
Illegality in English law is a potential ground in English contract law, tort or trusts for a court to refuse to enforce an obligation. The illegality of a transaction, either because of public policy...
Doctrine of Absurdity
An absurdity is a thing that is extremely unreasonable, so as to be foolish or not taken seriously, or the state of being so. "Absurd" is an adjective used to describe an absurdity, e.g., "this encycl...
Mischief rule
The mischief rule is one of three rules of statutory interpretation traditionally applied by English courts. The other two are the “plain meaning rule” (also known as the “literal rule”) and the “gold...