Avicenna
Avicenna was a brilliant polymath and healer who lived in the East from 980-1037. He bundled the knowledge of his time and wrote 450 tractates. His Book of ...
Averroism
Averroism is a school of Islamic philosophy that arose from the influence of the 12th century Al-Andalus Muslim philosopher Averroës, who worked on reconciling Aristotelianism with Islam. Alternativel...
Giles of Rome
Giles of Rome (Latin Ægidius Romanus, or in Italian Egidio Colonna; c. 1243, Rome – 22 December 1316, Avignon), was an archbishop of Bourges who was famed for his logician commentary on the Org...
Eustratius of Nicaea
Eustratius of Nicaea (Greek: Εὐστράτιος; c. 1050/1060 – c. 1120) was Metropolitan bishop of Nicaea in the early 12th century. He wrote commentaries to Aristotle's second book of Analytica and the ...
John Hennon
John (Johannes) Hennon (died after 1484) was a medieval philosopher in the late Scholastic tradition. He was from Nijmegen, and studied at the University of Paris, where he received his magister artiu...
Al-Kindi
Abu Yūsuf Yaʻqūb ibn ʼIsḥāq aṣ-Ṣabbāḥ al-Kindī (Arabic: أبو يوسف يعقوب بن إسحاق الصبّاح الكندي‎, Latin: Alkindus) (c. 801–873 CE), known as "the Philosopher of the Arabs", was an Iraqi M...
Sophonias (commentator)
Sophonias (Greek: Σοφονίας; 13th–14th century) was a Byzantine monk who wrote commentaries or paraphrases of the works of Aristotle including De Anima, Sophistici Elenchi, Prior Analytics, a...
Andronicus of Rhodes
Andronicus of Rhodes (Greek: Ἀνδρόνικος; fl. c. 60 BC) was a Greek philosopher from Rhodes who was also the head (scholarch) of the Peripatetic school. He is most famous for publishing a new editi...
Adam de Buckfield
Adam de Buckfield (b. ca. 1220 – d. before 1294) was an English Franciscan philosopher, who taught at the University of Oxford in the early 1240s. He was an early commentator on a number of Aris...
The Canon of Medicine
The Canon of Medicine (Arabic: القانون في الطب‎ al-Qānūn fī al-Ṭibb) is an encyclopedia of medicine in five books compiled by Persian philosopher Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna) and completed in 1025. I...
Dexippus (philosopher)
Dexippus (Greek: Δέξιππος; fl. 350) was a Greek philosopher, a pupil of the Neoplatonist Iamblichus, belonging to the middle of the 4th century AD. He wrote commentaries on Plato and Aristotle of ...
Adrastus of Aphrodisias
Adrastus (Greek: Ἄδραστος; fl. 2nd century) of Aphrodisias was a Peripatetic philosopher who lived in the 2nd century AD. He was the author of a treatise on the arrangement of Aristotle's writing...
Asclepius of Tralles
Asclepius of Tralles (Greek: Ἀσκληπιός; died c. 560–570) was a student of Ammonius Hermiae. Two works of his survive:Both works seem to be notes on the lectures conducted by Ammonius.
Themistius
Themistius (Greek: Θεμίστιος, Themistios; 317, Paphlagonia – c. 390 AD, Constantinople), named εὐφραδής (eloquent), was a statesman, rhetorician, and philosopher. He flourished in the reigns of Consta...
David Anhaght
David the Invincible (Classical Armenian: Դաւիթ Անյաղթ; Դավիթ Անհաղթ, Davit' Anhağt' ) was a 5th-century Armenian philosopher. He is best known as the author of several works including Definition...
Simplicius of Cilicia
Simplicius (/sɪmˈplɪʃiəs/; Greek: Σιμπλίκιος; c. 490 – c. 560) of Cilicia, was a disciple of Ammonius Hermiae and Damascius, and was one of the last of the Neoplatonists. He was among the pagan ph...
Elias (commentator)
Elias (/ɪˈlaɪəs/; Greek: Ἠλίας; fl. 6th century) was a Greek scholar and a commentator on Aristotle and Porphyry. He was a pupil of Olympiodorus in Alexandria in the late-6th century. His name suggest...
Nicolaus of Damascus
Nicolaus of Damascus (Greek: Νικόλαος Δαμασκηνός, Nikolāos Damaskēnos) was a Greek historian and philosopher who lived during the Augustan age of the Roman Empire. His name is derived from that of his...
Jean Buridan
Jean Buridan ([byʁidɑ̃]; Latin Johannes Buridanus; c. 1295 – after 1358) was a French priest who sowed the seeds of the Copernican revolution in Europe. He developed the concept of impetus, the first ...
Albertus Magnus
Albertus Magnus, O.P. (before 1200 – November 15, 1280), also known as Albert the Great and Albert of Cologne, is a Catholic saint. He was a German Dominican friar and a Catholic bishop. He was known ...
Porphyry (philosopher)
Porphyry of Tyre (/ˈpɔrfəri/; Greek: Πορφύριος, Porphyrios; c. 234 – c. 305 AD) was a Neoplatonic philosopher who was born in Tyre. He edited and published the Enneads, the only collection of the work...
Avicenna
Avicenna (/ˌævəˈsɛnə/; Latinate form of Ibn-Sīnā (Persian: پور سینا / ابن سینا‎‍; Arabic: ابن سینا‎‍), full name Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn Al-Hasan ibn Ali ib...
Al-Farabi
Al-Farabi (/ˌælfəˈrɑːbi/; Persian: ابونصر محمد بن محمد فارابی‎ Abū Naṣr Muḥammad ibn Muḥammad Fārābī; for other recorded variants of his name see below) , known in the West as Alpharabius (c. 87...
John Philoponus
John Philoponus (/fɨˈlɒpənəs/; Ἰωάννης ὁ Φιλόπονος; c. 490 – c. 570; also known as John the Grammarian or John of Alexandria) was an Alexandrian philologist, Aristotelian commentator and Christi...
Alexander of Aphrodisias
Alexander of Aphrodisias (Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Ἀφροδισιεύς; fl. 200 AD) was a Peripatetic philosopher and the most celebrated of the Ancient Greek commentators on the writings of Aristotle. He was a na...
David W. Hamlyn
David Walter Hamlyn (1 October 1924 – 15 July 2012) was Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck College, London (1964–1988), and editor of Mind (1972–1984). His major interests were in A...
Damascius
Damascius (/dəˈmæʃəs/; Greek: Δαμάσκιος, c. 458 – after 538), known as "the last of the Neoplatonists," was the last scholarch of the School of Athens. He was one of the pagan philosophers perse...
Gaetano da Thiene (philosopher)
Gaetano da Thiene (1387–1465) was a Renaissance philosopher and physician who was born and lived in Padua. A student of Paul of Venice, Gaetano, like his teacher, held an Averroist interpretation of A...