Classical order
"An Order in architecture is a certain assemblage of parts subject to uniform established proportions, regulated by the office that each part has to perform".The Architectural Orders are the ancient s...
Classical order - Wikipedia
Doric order
The Doric order was one of the three orders of ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two canonical orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian.
In their original Greek version, Doric col...
Doric order - Wikipedia
Ionic order
The Ionic order (Greek: Ιωνικός ρυθμός) forms one of the three orders of classical architecture, the other two canonic orders being the Doric and the Corinthian. (There are two lesser orders, the ...
Ionic order - Wikipedia
Corinthian order
The Corinthian order is the last developed of the three principal classical orders of ancient Greek and Roman architecture. The other two are the Doric order which was the earliest, followed by the Io...
Corinthian order - Wikipedia
Tuscan order
Among canon of classical orders of classical architecture, the Tuscan order's place is due to the influence of the Italian Sebastiano Serlio, who meticulously described the five orders including a "T...
Tuscan order - Wikipedia
Composite order
The composite order is a mixed order, combining the volutes of the Ionic order capital with the acanthus leaves of the Corinthian order. The composite order volutes are larger, however, and the compos...
The Five Orders of Architecture
The Five Orders of Architecture is a book on architecture by Giacomo Barozzi da Vignola from 1562, and is considered "one of the most successful architectural textbooks ever written", despite having n...
The Five Orders of Architecture - Wikipedia
Indo-Corinthian capital
Indo-Corinthian capitals are capitals crowning columns or pilasters, which can be found in the northwestern Indian subcontinent, and usually combine Hellenistic and Indian elements. These capitals are...
Indo-Corinthian capital - Wikipedia