Children's choir
A choir (/ˈkwaɪ.ər/) (also known as a chorale or chorus) is a musical ensemble of singers. Choral music, in turn, is the music written specifically for such an ensemble to perform.A body of singers wh...
Music of ancient Greece
The music of ancient Greece was almost universally present in society, from marriages and funerals to religious ceremonies, theatre, folk music and the ballad-like reciting of epic poetry. It thus pla...
Medieval music
Medieval music is Western music written during the Middle Ages. This era begins with the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century and ends sometime in the early fifteenth century. Establishing t...
Ibrahim ibn al-Mahdi
Ibrahim ibn al-Mahdi (Arabic: إبراهيم بن المهدي‎) (779–839) was an Abbasid prince, singer, composer and poet. He was the son of the third Abbasid caliph Al-Mahdi. He was not a full brother o...
Záviš ze Zap
Záviš ze Zap (c. 1350, Zápy – c. 1411) was a Czech theologian and composer.
He received a Baccalaureate from Charles University in Prague in 1379, and became a professor there in 1391. He also stu...
Celtic chant
Celtic chant is the liturgical plainchant repertory of the Celtic rite of the Roman Catholic Church performed in Great Britain, Ireland and Brittany. It is related to, but distinct from the Gregorian ...
Jehan de Lescurel
Jehan de Lescurel (also Jehannot de l'Escurel; died May 23, 1304) was a medieval poet and composer.Nothing is known of his life other than that he was the son of a merchant in Paris, and he probably r...
Daseian notation
Daseian notation (or dasian notation) is the type of musical notation used in the ninth century anonymous musical treatises Musica enchiriadis and Scolica enchiriadis. The music of the Musica enchiria...
Giovanni Mazzuoli
Giovanni Mazzuoli (also Giovanni degli Organi) (ca. 1360 – 14 May 1426) was an Italian composer and organist of the late medieval and early Renaissance eras.Mazzuoli was born in Florence and probably ...
Psalter (Bamberg, Staatsbibliothek, MS A. I. 14)
Bamberg State Library, Msc.Bibl.44 is an early 10th century Psalter made for Salomo III, the Abbot of St. Gall in 909. The Psalter has parallel texts with texts in two Latin versions, a Hebrew version...
Byttering
Byttering (also Bytering, Bytteryng, or Biteryng; possible first name Thomas) (fl. c. 1400 – 1420) was an English composer during the transitional period from Medieval to Renaissance styles. Fi...
Sequence (poetry)
A sequence (Latin: sequentia) is a chant or hymn sung or recited during the liturgical celebration of the Eucharist for many Christian denominations, before the proclamation of the Gospel. By the time...
Ensemble Santenay
Ensemble Santenay's is an early music ensemble, originating in the Institute of Early Music in Trossingen, Germany. It was established in May 2004 by four musicians of four different nationalities spe...
Troubadour
A troubadour (/ˈtruːbədʊər/, [tʁubaduʁ]; Occitan: trobador, [tɾuβaˈðu], [tɾuβaˈðor]) was a composer and performer of Old Occitan lyric poetry during the High Middle Ages (1100–1350). Since the wo...
François Andrieu
François Andrieu was a composer, most likely French, of the late 14th century. Nothing is known about him except that he wrote an elegy on the death of Guillaume de Machaut (1377), a four-voice balla...
Nicolaus Zacharie
Nicolaus Zacharie (c.1400 or before – 1466) was an Italian composer of the early Renaissance. Until recently he had been confused with the earlier composer Zacara da Teramo, but recent research has e...
Lai
A lai (or lay lyrique, "lyric lay", to distinguish it from a lai breton) is a lyrical, narrative poem written in octosyllabic couplets that often deals with tales of adventure and romance. Lais were m...
Bamberg Codex
The Bamberg Codex (Bamberg State Library, Msc.Lit.115) is a manuscript containing two treatises on music theory and a large body of 13th century French polyphony.The first part of the Bamberg Codex co...
Petrus de Cruce
Petrus de Cruce (Pierre de la Croix) was active as a cleric, composer and theorist in the late part of the 13th century. His main contribution was to the notational system.
13th-century composer,...
Notker the Stammerer
Notker the Stammerer (Latin: Notker Balbulus) (c. 840 – 6 April 912), also called Notker I, Notker the Poet or Notker of Saint Gall, was a musician, author, poet, and Benedictine monk at the Abbey...
La harpe de melodie
La Harpe de Melodie is a musical composition by Jacob Senleches in the ars subtilior style.It has been transmitted via two sources. The first source dated c. 1395 is the manuscript Chicago, Newberry L...
Prolation
Prolation is a term used in the theory of the mensural notation of medieval and Renaissance music to describe its rhythmic structure on a small scale. The term is derived from the Latin prolatio, firs...
Leonel Power
Leonel Power (1370 to 1385 – 5 June 1445) was an English composer of the late Medieval and early Renaissance eras. Along with John Dunstaple, he was one of the major figures in English music in...
Gymel
In medieval and early Renaissance English polyphonic music, gymel (also gimel or gemell) is the technique of temporarily dividing up one voice part, usually an upper one, into two parts of equal range...
Beneventan chant
Beneventan chant is a liturgical plainchant repertory of the Roman Catholic Church, used primarily in the orbit of the southern Italian ecclesiastical centers of Benevento and Montecassino, distinct f...
Baude Cordier
Baude Cordier (born c. 1380 in Rheims, died before 1440) was a French composer from Rheims; it has been suggested that Cordier was the nom de plume of Baude Fresnel. Cordier's works are considered amo...
Dame de Gosnai
Dame de Gosnai was a woman trouvère. She may have been a member of the Puy d'Arras.