Canon law
Canon law is the body of laws and regulations made by ecclesiastical authority (Church leadership), for the government of a Christian organization or church and its members. It is the internal ecclesi...
Canon law (Anglican Communion)
The Anglican Communion as a whole, unlike the Roman Catholic Church, does not have a centralized canon law of its own. Each of the autonomous member churches of Anglicanism, however, does have a cano...
Presbyterian polity
Presbyterian (or presbyteral) polity is a method of church governance typified by the rule of assemblies of presbyters, or elders. Each local church is governed by a body of elected elders usually cal...
Canon law (Catholic Church)
The canon law of the Catholic Church is the system of laws and legal principles made and enforced by the hierarchical authorities of the Church to regulate its external organization and government and...
Canon law (Catholic Church) - Wikipedia
Priest–penitent privilege
Known as the clergy-penitent privilege, clergy privilege, confessional privilege, priest-penitent privilege, clergyman-communicant privilege, and ecclesiastical privilege; it is an application of the...
Legitimacy Act 1959
The Legitimacy Act 1959 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was repealed by the Family Law Reform Act 1987.
Prior to the passing of the Act, legitimacy was governed by the Legit...
Priest–penitent privilege in England
The doctrine of priest–penitent privilege does not appear to apply in English law. The orthodox view is that under the law of England and Wales privileged communication exists only in the context of l...
Illegitimacy in fiction
This is a list of fictional stories in which illegitimacy features as an important plot element. Passing mentions are omitted from this article. Many of these stories explore the social pain and excl...
Illegitimacy in fiction - Wikipedia
Meletius of Lycopolis
Meletius (died after 325) was bishop of Lycopolis in Egypt. He is known mainly as the founder and namesake of the Meletians (c. 305), one of several schismatic sects in early church history which were...
Petrine privilege
Petrine privilege, also known as the privilege of the faith or favour of the faith, is a ground recognised in Catholic canon law allowing for dissolution by the Pope of a valid natural marriage betwee...
Primacy of the Roman Pontiff
The primacy of the Bishop of Rome is an ecclesiastical doctrine concerning the respect and authority that is due to the Bishop of Rome from other bishops and their sees. Together with the Filioque c...
Primacy of the Roman Pontiff - Wikipedia
Ordinary (officer)
An ordinary (from Latin ordinarius) is an officer of a church or civic authority who by reason of office has ordinary power to execute laws.Such officers are found in hierarchically organised churches...
Ordinary (officer) - Wikipedia
First Council of Nicaea
The First Council of Nicaea (/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈni:kaɪja]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Nicaea in Bithynia by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325. This first ecum...
First Council of Nicaea - Wikipedia
Development of the Christian biblical canon
The Christian biblical canons are the books Christians regard as divinely inspired and constituting a Christian Bible. Books included in the Christian biblical canons of both the Old and New Testament...
Development of the Christian biblical canon - Wikipedia
Excommunication
Excommunication is an institutional act of religious censure used to deprive, suspend, or limit membership in a religious community or to restrict certain rights within it, in particular reception of ...
Excommunication - Wikipedia
Legitimacy Act 1926
The Legitimacy Act 1926 was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. The purpose of the Legitimacy Act 1926 was to amend the law relating to children born out of wedlock.
The fundamental pr...
Legitimacy Act 1926 - Wikipedia
Lex (canon law)
'Lex' is Latin for one sense of the English term, law. In the Canon Law of the Catholic Church, lex refers to law which has been formulated in written form and promulgated by competent authority. W...
Church Order (Lutheran)
The Church Order or Church Ordinance (German: Kirchenordnung) means the general ecclesiastical constitution of a State.The early Evangelical Church attached less importance to ecclesiastical ritua...
Church Order (Lutheran) - Wikipedia
Zoen Tencarari
Zoen Tencarari was an Italian canon lawyer, papal vice-legate, and bishop of Avignon from 1240 to about 1261. He taught at the University of Bologna, where in 1256 he founded a college. He glossed th...
Legitimation
Legitimation or legitimization is the act of providing legitimacy. Legitimation in the social sciences refers to the process whereby an act, process, or ideology becomes legitimate by its attachment ...
Legitimation - Wikipedia
Herem (censure)
Herem (or Chērem חרם) is the highest ecclesiastical censure in the Jewish community. It is the total exclusion of a person from the Jewish community. It is a form of shunning, and is similar to vitand...
Herem (censure) - Wikipedia
Legitimacy (law)
In Western common law, legitimacy is the status of a child born to parents who are legally married to each other; and of a child conceived before the parents receive a legal divorce. Conversely, illeg...
Legitimacy (law) - Wikipedia
Richard White of Basingstoke
Richard White (1539–1611) was an English jurist and historian, in later life an expatriate scholar who became a Catholic priest.
He was son of Henry White of Basingstoke, Hampshire, who died at th...
Richard White of Basingstoke - Wikipedia
Latae sententiae
Latae sententiae is a Latin phrase, meaning "sentence (already) passed", used in the canon law of the Catholic Church.A latae sententiae penalty is one that follows ipso facto or automatically, by for...
Bastard (Law of England and Wales)
A bastard (also called whoreson) in the law of England and Wales is a person whose parents were not married at the time of his or her birth, or indeed his or her conception. Should a married couple di...
Bastard (Law of England and Wales) - Wikipedia
Priest–penitent privilege in pre-Reformation England
The doctrine of priest–penitent privilege does not apply in the United Kingdom. However, before the Reformation, England was a Roman Catholic country and the Seal of the Confessional had great authori...
Seal of the Confessional and the Anglican Church
The Seal of the Confessional is a principle of the Anglican Church that protects the words spoken during confession. Confession has certain censures on disclosure as there is an understanding among th...