Byzantine music
Byzantine music (Modern Greek: Βυζαντινή μουσική), in a narrow sense, is the music of the Byzantine Empire. Originally it consisted of songs and hymns composed to Greek texts used for courtly cere...
Byzantine music - Wikipedia
An example of Byzantine chant
Medieval Byzantine Chant dedicated to Virgin Mary. Title: "?e?te ?a??" (Come ye peoples) Performers: Greek Byzantine Choir Album: "Hymns to the Most Holy The...
Byzantine music tutorial
This tutorial goes through a little background on Byzantine Chant, specifically for western musicians, and begins introducing the notation and theory behind ...
Cappella Romana
Cappella Romana http://www.cappellaromana.org presents The Bodiless Powers: Angelic Song in Byzantine Chant. John Michael Boyer will lead the men of Cappel...
Lyre
For more brilliant natural history shows, exclusive to YouTube, head over to our brand-new channel Earth Unplugged! http://www.youtube.com/earthunplugged Cli...
Byzantine music - Music in Hagia Sofia
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gquhL5ZGrPQ Εξέδυσαν με. Οι ανθρωποι βάζουν στον πλάστη τους και Θεό στέφανον εξ ακανθών, του δίνουν να πιεί όξος, τον ραπίζ...
Byzantine music
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gquhL5ZGrPQ Εξέδυσαν με. Οι ανθρωποι βάζουν στον πλάστη τους και Θεό στέφανον εξ ακανθών, του δίνουν να πιεί όξος, τον ραπίζ...
Byzantine music
Ἀλληλούϊα. -Ὑψώσω σε ὁ Θεός μου, ὁ Βασιλεύς μου καὶ εὐλογήσω τὸ ὄνομά Σου εἰς τὸν αἰῶνα καὶ εἰς τὸν αἰῶνα τοῦ αἰῶνος. Ἀλληλούϊα. -Καθ'ἑκάστην ἡμέρα εὐλογήσω ...
Greek Orthodox Christian Byzantine Chant (Theotokario ... - YouTube
May 28, 2007 ... This is a sample of Greek Orthodox Byzantine music chanted by nuns in a Monastery of northern Greek Mainland (Hsuxastirio Timiou ...
Byzantine Music - YouTube
Mar 19, 2013 ... Byzantine Music -Byzantine music (Modern Greek: ???a?t??? ???s???) is the music of the Byzantine Empire composed to Greek texts as ...
Byzantine music - Hymn
This is a Greek Orthodox Christian Chant from a book called To Psaltirio. The hymn is located in the 8th Ode of the collection.
Tetrachord
In music theory, traditionally, a tetrachord (Greek: τετράχορδoν, Latin: tetrachordum) is a series of three smaller intervals that span the interval of a perfect fourth, a 4:3 frequency propor...
Tetrachord - Wikipedia
Hagiopolitan Octoechos
Oktōēchos (here transcribed "Octoechos"; Greek: ὁ Ὀκτώηχος pronounced in koine: [okˈtóixos]; from ὀκτώ "eight" and ἦχος "sound, mode" called echos; Slavonic: Осмогласие, Osmoglasie from о́смь "eight" ...
Hagiopolitan Octoechos - Wikipedia
Cosmas of Maiuma
Saint Cosmas of Maiuma, also called Cosmas Hagiopolites ("of the Holy City"), Cosmas of Jerusalem, or Cosmas the Melodist, or Cosmas the Poet (d. 773 or 794), was a bishop and hymnographer (writer of ...
Cosmas of Maiuma - Wikipedia
Chromatic scale
short song that uses the chromatic scale in the beginning as well as in the distorted part at 0:35The chromatic scale is a musical scale with twelve pitches, each a semitone above or below another. ...
Chromatic scale - Wikipedia
Petros Gaitanos
Petros Gaitanos (Greek: Πέτρος Γαϊτάνος born on October 31, 1967) is a Greek singer. He was born in Drama and raised in the village of Kokkinogeia, where he remained until the age of 18 years.He s...
Papadic Octoechos
Oktōēchos (here transcribed "Octoechos"; Greek: ὁ Ὀκτώηχος, pronounced in Constantinopolitan: [oxˈtóixos]; from ὀκτώ "eight" and ἦχος "sound, mode" called echos; Slavonic: Осмогласие, Osmoglasie from ...
Papadic Octoechos - Wikipedia
Konstantinos Pringos
Konstantinos Pringos (1892 in Constantinople – 1964 in Athens) was a protopsaltes (leading cantor) in the Great Church of Constantinople from 1939 until 1959. In this position, he succeeded Iakovos Na...
Echos
Echos (Greek: ἦχος, [ˈixos] "sound"; pl. Echoi ἦχοι [ˈiçi], Old Church Slavonic: гласъ [glasŭ] "voice, sound") is the name in Byzantine music theory for a mode within the eight mode system (oktoechos)...
Chromatic genus
Genus (Gr.: γένος [genos], pl. γένη [genē], "type, kind") is a term used in the Ancient Greek theory of music to describe either certain classes of intonations of the two movable notes within a tetrac...
Chromatic genus - Wikipedia
Petasti
Petasti (or Petaste; Greek: πεταστη) is a neume of Byzantine chant notation, which is usually called a flutter in English. In the most general form it means "Go one note up, and stress this note", whe...
Lyre
The lyre (Greek: λύρα, lýra) is a string instrument known for its use in Greek classical antiquity and later. The lyre is similar in appearance to a small harp but with distinct differences. The word ...
Lyre - Wikipedia
Cretan lyra
The Cretan lyra (Greek: Κρητική λύρα) is a Greek pear-shaped, three-stringed bowed musical instrument, central to the traditional music of Crete and other islands in the Dodecanese and the Aegean ...
Cretan lyra - Wikipedia
Jessica Suchy-Pilalis
Jessica R. Suchy-Pilalis (born 1954) is an American harpist, Byzantine singer, composer and music educator.
Jessica Suchy-Pilalis grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, with her father (Raymond W. Suchy...
Chronis Aidonidis
Chronis Aidonidis (Greek: Χρόνης Αηδονίδης) is a Greek singer born on December 23, 1928 in Karoti, a village now belonging to Didymoteicho, in Greece. His parents were Christos and Chrysanthi Aido...
Chronis Aidonidis - Wikipedia
Diatonic and chromatic
Diatonic (Greek: διατονική) and chromatic (Greek: χρωματική) are terms in music theory that are most often used to characterize scales, and are also applied to musical instruments, intervals, ...
Diatonic and chromatic - Wikipedia
Thrasyvoulos Stanitsas
Thrasyvoulos Stanitsas (Greek: Θρασύβουλος Στανίτσας, 1910–1987) was a protopsaltes (leading cantor) in the Great Church of Constantinople from 1960 until 1964. In this position, he succeeded his ...
Museum of Ancient Greek, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Instruments
The Museum of Ancient Greek, Byzantine & Postbyzantine Instruments is a museum in Thessaloniki, Central Macedonia, Greece. The museum opened in 1997 in a restored three-storey building in the Lada...
Museum of Ancient Greek, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Instruments - Wikipedia