Appellate review
In law, an appeal is a process for requesting a formal change to an official decision. They normally consist of an appellant, who requests the appeal, and an appellee who is subject to it (these terms...
Tom Brady's NFL Suspension Upheld By Federal Appeals Court
A three-judge panel overturned a lower court's ruling that found NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was not fair when he handed down the suspension.
United States courts of appeals
The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the intermediate appellate courts of the United States federal court system. A court of appeals decides appeals from the district courts wit...
Harmless error
A harmless error is a ruling by a trial judge that, although mistaken, does not meet the burden for a losing party to reverse the original decision of the trier of fact on appeal, or to warrant a new ...
Tom Brady's NFL Suspension Upheld By Federal Appeals Court
A three-judge panel overturned a lower court's ruling that found NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was not fair when he handed down the suspension.
Discretionary review
Discretionary review is the authority appellate courts have to decide which appeals they will consider from among the cases submitted to them. This offers the judiciary a filter on what types of cases...
Appellate procedure in the United States
In United States appellate procedure, an appeal is a petition for review of a case that has been decided by a court of law. The petition is made to a higher court for the purpose of overturning the l...
Trial de novo
In law, the expression trial de novo means a "new trial" by a different tribunal (de novo is a Latin expression meaning "afresh", "anew", "beginning again", hence the literal meaning "new trial"). A t...
Appeal
In law, an appeal is a process for requesting a formal change to an official decision. They normally consist of an appellant, who requests the appeal, and an appellee who is subject to it (these terms...
Reversible error
In law, a reversible error is an error by the trier of law (judge) or the trier of fact (the jury or the judge if it is a bench trial) or malfeasance by one of the trying attorneys, which results in a...
Standard of review
In law, the standard of review is the amount of deference given by one court (or some other appellate tribunal) in reviewing a decision of a lower court or tribunal. A low standard of review means tha...
Error (law)

There are many kinds of error in law. Reversible error can lead to a judgment being overturned on appeal. Harmless error is distinguished from plain error in that if error is preserved by the mak...
Appellate jurisdiction
Appellate jurisdiction is the power of a court to review decisions and change outcomes of decisions of lower courts. Most appellate jurisdiction is legislatively created, and may consist of appeals by...
Procedures of the Supreme Court of the United States
The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest federal court in the United States and the only court specifically established by the Constitution of the United States, implemented in 1789.This ...
Interlocutory appeal
An interlocutory appeal (or interim appeal), in the law of civil procedure, is an appeal of a ruling by a trial court that is made before all claims are resolved as to all parties. For instance, if a ...
Certiorari before judgment
A petition for certiorari before judgment, in the Supreme Court of the United States, is a petition for a writ of certiorari in which the Supreme Court is asked to immediately review the decision of a...
Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure
The Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure (FRAP) are a set of rules, promulgated by the Supreme Court of the United States on recommendation of an advisory committee, to govern procedures in cases in t...
Certiorari
Certiorari (/ˌsɜrʃⁱəˈrɛəraɪ/, /-ˈrɛəri/, or /-ˈrɑri/), often abbreviated as cert. in the United States, is a writ seeking judicial review. It is issued by a superior court, directing an inferior cour...
Companion case
The term companion cases refers to a group of two or more cases which are consolidated by an appellate court while on appeal and are decided together because they concern one or more common legal issu...
Certificate of division
A certificate of division was a source of appellate jurisdiction from the circuit courts to the Supreme Court of the United States from 1802 to 1911. Created by the Judiciary Act of 1802, the certific...
Invited error
Invited error refers to a trial court's error against which a party cannot complain to an appellate court because the party encouraged or prompted the error by its own conduct during the trial. The or...
Judicial review in the United States
Judicial review in the United States is the ability of a court to examine and decide if a statute, treaty or administrative regulation contradicts or violates the provisions of existing law, a State C...
Certified question
In the law of the United States, a certified question is a formal request by one court to one of its sister courts, usually but not always in another jurisdiction, for an opinion on a question of law....
Liberty Oil Co. v. Condon Nat. Bank
Liberty Oil Co. v. Condon National Bank, 260 U.S. 235 (1922), was a decision by the Supreme Court of the United States dealing with civil procedure and the nature of taking an appeal from the United S...