The Sea People - Inscriptions in The Mortuary Temple of Ramesses III at Medinet Habu
Medinet Habu is a mortuary temple that was constructed for Ramesess III at Thebes in Upper Egypt. The temple decoration consists of a series of reliefs and texts telling of the many exploits of the ki...
Alashiya
Alashiya or Alasiya was a state which existed in the Middle and Late Bronze Ages, and was situated somewhere in the Eastern Mediterranean. It was a major source of goods, especially copper, for Ancien...
The Sea People - Inscriptions in The Mortuary Temple of Ramesses III at Medinet Habu
Medinet Habu is a mortuary temple that was constructed for Ramesess III at Thebes in Upper Egypt. The temple decoration consists of a series of reliefs and texts telling of the many exploits of the ki...
Taphians
In Homeric Greece, the islands of Taphos (Τάφος) lay in the Ionian Sea off the coast of Acarnania in northwestern Greece, home of seagoing and piratical inhabitants, the Taphians (Τάφιοι). Penelope me...
Anicetus (pirate)
Anicetus was the leader of an unsuccessful anti-Roman uprising in Colchis in 69/ Formerly a freedman of King Polemon II of Pontus, Anicetus commanded the royal fleet until Polemonia was converted into...
Tel Dor
Tel Dor (Kh. al-Burj or Tantura), is an archeological site located on Israel's Mediterranean coast, about 30 km south of Haifa. Lying on a small headland at the north side of a protected inlet, ...
Demetrius of Pharos
Demetrius of Pharos (also Pharus) (Greek: Δημήτριος ἐκ Φάρου) was a ruler of Pharos involved in the First Illyrian War, after which he ruled a portion of the Illyrian Adriatic coast on behalf of t...
Battle of Djahy (12th century BC)
The Battle of Djahy was a major land battle between the forces of pharaoh Ramesses III and the Sea Peoples who intended to invade and conquer Egypt. The conflict occurred somewhere on the Ancient Egyp...
Teleboans
In Greek mythology, the Teleboans /təˈlɛbɵ.ənz/ (Ancient Greek: Τηλεβόαι, Tēlebóai) were an Acarnanian tribe. They were said to descend from one Teleboas /təˈlɛbɵ.əs/, a son of Pterelaus and brot...
Glaucetas
Glaucetas (Greek: Γλαυκέτας), sometimes transliterated Glauketas (fl. 315 – 300 BC), was a corsair chiefly active in the Aegean Sea during the 4th Century BC. Although little is known about his li...
Meshwesh
Mšwš.w / Mꜥ-šꜣ-wꜣ-šꜣ.w MeshweshThe Meshwesh (often abbreviated in ancient Egyptian as Ma) were an ancient Libyan tribe from beyond Cyrenaica where the Libu and Tehenu lived according to Egyptian re...
History of Sicily
The history of Sicily has seen Sicily usually controlled by greater powers—Roman, Vandal, Byzantine, Islamic, Norman, Hohenstaufen, Catalan, Spaniard—but also experiencing short periods of...
Dionysius the Phocaean
Dionysius the Phocaean or Dionysius of Phocaea (fl. 494 BC) was a Phocaean admiral of Ancient Greece during the Persian Wars of 5th century BC, and was the commander of the Ionian fleet at the Battle ...
Tyrrhenians
The Tyrrhenians (Attic Greek: Τυρρηνοί Turrhēnoi) or Tyrsenians (Ionic: Τυρσηνοί Tursēnoi; Doric: Τυρσανοί Tursānoi) is an exonym used by Greek authors to refer to a non-Greek people.
The origin...
Achaeans (Homer)
The Achaeans (/əˈkiːənz/; Ancient Greek: Ἀχαιοί Akhaioí) constitute one of the collective names for the Greeks in Homer's Iliad (used 598 times) and Odyssey. The other common names are Danaans (/...
Agron of Illyria
Agron (/ˈæɡrən/ or /ˈæɡˌrɒn/; Greek: Ἄγρων; ruled c. 250 – 231 BC) was a king of the Ardiaean Kingdom. The son of Pleuratus II, Agron brought about a great revival among the Illyrians; during his ...
Bronze Age collapse
The Late Bronze Age collapse was a transition in the Aegean Region, Southwestern Asia and the Eastern Mediterranean from the Late Bronze Age to the Early Iron Age that historians believe was violent, ...
Beder (ancient ruler)
Beder or Bederi is a Tjeker leader and ruler of Dor; while in other traditions, he also had a servant named Thorpayuran, mentioned in the Story of Wenamun. His historicity is a matter of dispute among...
Panares
Panares was a general of the ancient city of Kydonia at the time which the Romans attacked the city in 69 BC. In this era Kydonia had aligned itself with the interests of pirates and incurred the ange...
Lukka lands
The Lukka lands are often mentioned in Hittite texts from the 2nd millennium BC. It denotes a region in the southwestern part of Anatolia. The Lukka lands were never put under permanent Hittite contro...
Mycenaean Greece
Mycenaean Greece refers to the last phase of the Bronze Age in Ancient Greece (ca. 1600–1100 BC). It takes its name from the archaeological site of Mycenae in Argolis, Peloponnese, southern Greece. Ot...
Battle of the Delta
The Battle of the Delta was a sea battle between Egypt and the Sea Peoples, circa 1175 BCE when the Egyptian pharaoh Ramesses III repulsed a major sea invasion. The conflict occurred somewhere at the ...
Libu
The Libu (, R'bw, Ribou, Labu) were an ancient Libyan Berber tribe, from which the name Libya derives. They were closely related to the Ancient Egyptians.Their occupation of ancient Libya is first at...
Great Karnak Inscription
Located on the wall of the Cachette Court, in the Precinct of Amun-Re of the Karnak temple complex, in modern Luxor, the Great Karnak Inscription of Merneptah is a record of the campaigns of this king...
Cilician pirates
Cilician pirates dominated the Mediterranean Sea from the 2nd century BC until their speedy suppression by Pompey in 67-66 BC. Although there were notorious pirate strongholds in Cilicia, Cilician had...
Dicaearchus of Aetolia
Dicaearchus, Dicearchus, or Diceärch (died 196 BC) was an Aetolian commander and pirate. In 205–204 BC, Dicaearchus was employed by Philip V of Macedon to raid the Cyclades and Rhodian ships. Dicaearc...
Sherden
The Sherden (Egyptian šrdn, š3rd3n3 or š3rdyn3, Ugaritic šrdnn(m) and trtn(m), possibly Akkadian še–er–ta–an–nu; also glossed “Shardana” or “Sherdanu”) are one of several groups of "Sea Peoples" who a...