Ancient economic thought
In the history of economic thought, ancient economic thought refers to the ideas from people before the Middle Ages.Economics in the classical age is defined in the modern analysis as a factor of ethi...
Ancient economic thought - Wikipedia
'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
Xenophon
Xenophon (/ˈzɛnəfən, -ˌfɒn/; Greek: Ξενοφῶν [ksenopʰɔ̂ːn], Xenophōn; c. 430 – 354 BC), son of Gryllus, of the deme Erchia of Athens, also known as Xenophon of Athens, was a Greek historian, soldi...
Xenophon - Wikipedia
Aristotle
Aristotle (/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/; Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης [aristotélɛːs], Aristotélēs; 384 – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher and scientist born in the Macedonian city of Stagira, Chalkidice, on...
Aristotle - Wikipedia
Roman law
Roman law is the legal system of ancient Rome, including Roman Military Jurisdiction and the legal developments spanning over a thousand years of jurisprudence, from the 12 Tables (c. 449 BC), to the ...
Chanakya
Chanakya ( pronunciation ; 350 – 275 BCE)was an Indian teacher, philosopher, and royal advisor.Originally a professor of economics and political science at the ancient Takshashila University...
Chanakya - Wikipedia
Arthashastra
The Arthashastra (Sanskrit: अर्थशास्त्र; IAST: Arthaśāstra) is an ancient Indian treatise on statecraft, economic policy and military strategy, written in Sanskrit. It identifies its author by the nam...
Wang Anshi
Wang Anshi (Chinese: 王安石; December 8, 1021 – May 21, 1086 ) was a Chinese economist, statesman, chancellor and poet of the Song Dynasty who attempted controversial, major socioeconomic refor...
Wang Anshi - Wikipedia
Islamic economics in the world
Islamic economics in practice, or economic policies supported by self-identified Islamic groups, has varied throughout its long history. Traditional Islamic concepts having to do with economics includ...
Ibn Khaldun
Ibn Khaldūn (full name, Arabic: أبو زيد عبد الرحمن بن محمد بن خلدون الحضرمي‎, Abū Zayd ‘Abdu r-Raḥmān bin Muḥammad bin Khaldūn Al-Ḥaḍrami; May 27, 1332 CE – March 19, 1406 CE was an Arab Mu...
Ibn Khaldun - Wikipedia
Muqaddimah
The Muqaddimah, also known as the Muqaddimah of Ibn Khaldun (Arabic: مقدّمة ابن خلدون, meaning in English: Ibn Khaldun's Introduction) or Ibn Khaldun's Prolegomena (Greek: Προλεγόμενα), is a book wr...
Asabiyyah
`Asabiyya or asabiyah (Arabic: عصبية, ʻaṣabīya) refers to social solidarity with an emphasis on unity, group consciousness and sense of shared purpose, and social cohesion, originally in a context of ...
Early reforms under Islam
Many social changes took place under Islam between 610 and 661, including the period of Muhammad's mission and the rule of his four immediate successors who established the Rashidun Caliphate.Historia...
Early reforms under Islam - Wikipedia
'Aristotle's Tomb' Discovered By Archaeologist
A Greek archaeologist believes he may have discovered Aristotle’s tomb. Konstantinos Sismanidis excavated the birthplace of the ancient philosopher in northern Greece in the 1990s, and now thinks that...
Medieval Roman law
Medieval Roman law is the continuation and development of ancient Roman law that developed in the European Late Middle Ages. Based on the ancient text of Roman law, the Corpus iuris civilis, it added ...
Corpus Juris Civilis
The Corpus Juris (or Iuris) Civilis ("Body of Civil Law") is the modern name for a collection of fundamental works in jurisprudence, issued from 529 to 534 by order of Justinian I, Eastern Roman Empe...
Corpus Juris Civilis - Wikipedia
Islamic Socialism
Islamic socialism is a term coined by various Muslim leaders to describe a more spiritual form of socialism. Muslim socialists believe that the teachings of the Qur'an and Muhammad—especially zakāt—...
Riba
Riba (Arabic: ربا‎ ribā, [ˈrɪbæː]) can be roughly translated as "Usury", or unjust, exploitive gains made in trade or business. Riba is mentioned and condemned in several different verses i...
Waqf
A waqf, also spelled wakf, (Arabic: وقف‎, pronounced [ˈwɑqf]; plural Arabic: أوقاف‎, awqāf; Turkish: vakıf, Urdu: وقف‎), or mortmain property, is, under the context o...
Waqf - Wikipedia
Byzantine law
Byzantine Law was essentially a continuation of Roman Law with Christian influence; however, this is not to doubt its later influence on the western practice of jurisprudence. Byzantine Law was effect...
Byzantine law - Wikipedia
Fiqh
Fiqh (/fɪk/; Arabic: فقه‎ [fiqh]) is Islamic jurisprudence. While Sharia is believed by Muslims to represent divine law as revealed in the Quran and the Sunnah (the teachings and practice...
Fiqh - Wikipedia
Term logic
In philosophy, term logic, also known as traditional logic or Aristotelian logic, is a loose name for the way of doing logic that began with Aristotle and that was dominant until the advent of modern ...
Four causes
"Four causes" refers to an influential principle in Aristotelian thought whereby causes of change or movement are categorized into four fundamental types of answer to the question "why?". Aristotle wr...
Aemilius Papinianus
Aemilius Papinianus (142–212), also known as Papinian, was a celebrated Roman jurist, magister libellorum, attorney general (advocatus fisci) and, after the death of Gaius Fulvius Plautianus in ...
Roman litigation
The history of Roman Law can be divided into three systems of procedure: that of legis actiones, the formulary system, and cognitio extraordinarem. The periods in which these systems were in use overl...
Julius Paulus Prudentissimus
Julius Paulus Prudentissimus (Greek: Ἰούλιος Παῦλος; fl. 2nd century and 3rd century AD) was one of the most influential and distinguished Roman jurists. He was also a praetorian prefect under th...
Physics (Aristotle)
The Physics (Greek: Φυσικὴ ἀκρόασις Phusike akroasis; Latin: Physica, or Physicae Auscultationes, meaning "lectures on nature") of Aristotle is one of the foundational books of Western science and phi...
Physics (Aristotle) - Wikipedia