Ancient Greek theatre
The Theatre Of Ancient Greece, Or Ancient Greek drama, is a theatrical culture that flourished in ancient Greece 700 BC. The city-state of Athens, which became a significant cultural, political, and m...
Ancient Greek theatre
every Greek city had the theater, in Athens, Sparta, Pella,corinth, in cities of Asia Minor, Cyprus,in Magna Grecia-Italy, and to the distant Greek colonies ...
Ancient Greek comedy
Ancient Greek comedy was one of the final three principal dramatic forms in the theatre of classical Greece (the others being tragedy and the satyr play). Athenian comedy is conventionally divided int...
Tragedy
Tragedy (from the Greek: τραγῳδία, tragōidia) is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes in its audience an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in the viewing. While many cultures have d...
Satyr play
Satyr plays were an ancient Greek form of tragicomedy, similar in spirit to the bawdy satire of burlesque. They featured choruses of satyrs, were based on Greek mythology, and were rife with mock drun...
Greek chorus
A Greek chorus (Greek: χορός, khoros) is a homogeneous, non-individualised group of performers in the plays of classical Greece, who comment with a collective voice on the dramatic action. The chorus...
Theatre of Dionysus
The Theatre of Dionysus Eleuthereus is a major open-air theatre and one of the earliest preserved in Athens. It was used for festivals in honor of the god Dionysus. Greek theaters in antiquity were in...
Cult of Dionysus
The Cult of Dionysus is strongly associated with satyrs, centaurs, and sileni, and its characteristic symbols are the bull, the serpent, the ivy, and the wine. The Dionysia and Lenaia festivals in Ath...
Melpomene
Melpomene (/mɛlˈpɒmɨniː/; Greek: Μελπομένη; "to sing" or "the one that is melodious"), initially the Muse of Singing, she then became the Muse of Tragedy, for which she is best known now. Her name...
Bacchanalia
The Bacchanalia were Roman festivals of Bacchus, based on various ecstatic elements of the Greek Dionysia. They seem to have been popular, and well-organised, throughout the central and southern Itali...
Representation of women in Athenian tragedy
The representation of women in Athenian tragedy was performed exclusively by men and it is likely (although the evidence is not conclusive) that it was performed solely for men as well.In a society th...
Use of costume in Athenian tragedy
Some authors have argued that use of costume in Athenian tragedy was standardized for the genre. This is said to have consisted of a full-length or short tunic, a cloak and soft leather boots, and may...
Sparagmos
Sparagmos (Ancient Greek: σπαραγμός, from σπαράσσω sparasso, "tear, rend, pull to pieces") is an act of rending, tearing apart, or mangling, usually in a Dionysian context.In Dionysian rite as re...
Medea (1988 film)
Medea is a 1988 TV movie directed by Lars von Trier. It is based on Carl Theodor Dreyer's adaptation of Euripides' play Medea.
King Creon of Corinth wants to secure his throne. In order to do thi...
Epode
Epode, in verse, is the third part of an ode, which followed the strophe and the antistrophe, and completed the movement.At a certain point in time the choirs, which had previously chanted to right of...
Mimesis
Mimesis (Ancient Greek: μίμησις (mīmēsis), from μιμεῖσθαι (mīmeisthai), "to imitate," from μῖμος (mimos), "imitator, actor") is a critical and philosophical term that carries a wide range of mean...
First Ancient Theatre, Larissa
The First Ancient Theatre of Larissa (Α' Αρχαίο Θέατρο Λάρισας) is a major open-air theatre and the largest theater in Thessaly, with a seating capability of 10,000 persons. It is situated on the sout...
Eiron
In the theatre of ancient Greece, the eirôn (Ancient Greek: εἴρων) was one of three stock characters in comedy. The eirôn usually succeeded in bringing down his braggart opponent (the alazôn) by ...
Greek tragedy
Greek tragedy is a form of theatre from Ancient Greece and Asia Minor. It reached its most significant form in Athens in the 5th century BC. Greek tragedy is an extension of the ancient rites done in ...
Sock and Buskin
The sock and buskin are two ancient symbols of comedy and tragedy. In Greek theatre, actors in tragic roles wore a boot called a buskin (Latin cothurnus) that elevated them above the other actors. The...
Lexis (Aristotle)
In philosophical discourse, lexis (from the Greek: λέξις "word") is a complete group of words in a language, vocabulary, the total set of all words in a language, and all words that have meaning or a ...