8 Key Contributors To The Underground Railroad
In the decades preceding the Civil War, up to 100,000 slaves escaped to the Northern free states or the “promised land” of Canada. Most received help along the way from abolitionists, who ran a vast, ...
8 Key Contributors To The Underground Railroad
In the decades preceding the Civil War, up to 100,000 slaves escaped to the Northern free states or the “promised land” of Canada. Most received help along the way from abolitionists, who ran a vast, ...
Strivers' Section Historic District
The Strivers' Section is a historic district located in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Northwest Washington, D.C.Strivers' Section was historically an enclave of upper-middle-class African American...
Robert Morris (lawyer)
Robert Morris (June 8, 1823 – December 12, 1882) was one of the first African-American attorneys in the United States, and was called "the first really successful colored lawyer in America."
Admit...
Benjamin "Pap" Singleton
Benjamin "Pap" Singleton (1809–1900) was an American activist and businessman best known for his role in establishing African American settlements in Kansas. A former slave from Tennessee who escaped ...
Jermain Wesley Loguen
Jermain Wesley Loguen (February 5, 1813 – September 30, 1872), born Jarm Logue, in slavery, was an African-American abolitionist and bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, a...
Charles Bennett Ray
Charles Bennett Ray (December 25, 1807 – August 15, 1886) was a prominent African-American abolitionist, the owner and editor of the weekly newspaper The Colored American, and a notable journalist and...
Mary Ann Shadd
Mary Ann Shadd Cary (October 9, 1823 – June 5, 1893) was an American-Canadian anti-slavery activist, journalist, publisher, teacher and lawyer. She was the first black woman publisher in North America...
Sarah Harris Fayerweather
Sarah Harris Fayerweather (1812–1878) was an African-American activist who worked for abolitionism in Kingston, Rhode Island. As a young woman, she attended Prudence Crandall's school in Canterbury, C...
Shields Green
Shields Green (1836?-1859), also known as "Emperor," was an ex-slave who participated in John Brown's unsuccessful raid on Harpers Ferry. Though he had a chance to escape capture, he returned to the ...
Frances Harper
Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (September 24, 1825 – February 22, 1911) was an African-American abolitionist, poet and author. She was also active in other types of social reform and was a member of the...
Frederick Douglass Academy
Frederick Douglass Academy (also known as FDA), formerly known as IS 10, is a co-educational public school for grades 6-12 located in West Harlem, New York City. It offers an SAT prep course program. ...
Mary Ellen Pleasant
Mary Ellen Pleasant (born 19 August 1814 – 1817 - died 4 January 1904) was a 19th-century African American entrepreneur widely known as Mammy Pleasant, who used her fortune to further the abolitionist...
Susan Paul
Susan Paul (1809–1841) was an African-American abolitionist from Boston, Massachusetts. A primary school teacher and member of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, Paul also wrote the first b...
George Fayerweather
George Fayerweather III (1802–1869) was a blacksmith and activist for abolitionism. He was of mixed Narragansett and African ancestry from South Kingstown, Rhode Island.
Fayerweather was born to ...
Charlotte Forten Grimké
Charlotte Louise Bridges Forten Grimké (August 17, 1837 – July 23, 1914) was an African-American anti-slavery activist, poet, and educator. She grew up in a prominent abolitionist family in Philadelph...
Alexander Crummell
Alexander Crummell (March 3, 1819 - September 10, 1898) was a pioneering African-American priest, professor and African nationalist. Ordained as an Episcopal priest in the United States, Crummell went...
James McCune Smith
James McCune Smith (April 18, 1813 – November 17, 1865) was an American physician, apothecary, abolitionist, and author. He is the first African American to hold a medical degree and graduated at the ...
William Parker (abolitionist)
William Parker (1821 - 1891) was a former slave who escaped to Pennsylvania, where he became an abolitionist and anti-slavery activist in Christiana, where he was a farmer and led a black self-defense...
David Walker (abolitionist)
David Walker (September 28, 1796 – August 6, 1830) was an outspoken African-American abolitionist and anti-slavery activist. In 1829, while living in Boston, Massachusetts, he published...
Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin
Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin (August 31, 1842 – March 13, 1924) was an African-American publisher, journalist, civil rights leader, suffragist, and editor of Women’s Era, the first newspaper published ...
Julia C. Collins
Julia C. Collins (c. 1842 - November 25, 1865), was an African-American schoolteacher in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, who in 1864 and 1865 contributed essays and other writings to the Christian Recorde...
Lewis Temple
Lewis Temple (22 October 1800 – 18 May 1854) was an American blacksmith, abolitionist, and inventor. He was born in slavery in Richmond, Virginia, and moved to the whaling village of New Bedford, Mass...
Robert Roberts (butler)
Robert Roberts (1780 in Charleston, South Carolina – 1860) was the author of The House Servant's Directory: A Monitor for Private Families. First published in 1827, the book was the first commer...
Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church
Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church (Metropolitan AME Church) is a historic church located at 1518 M Street, N.W., in downtown Washington, D.C.The congregation was founded in 1838 and the ...
Josiah Henson
Josiah Henson (June 15, 1789 – May 5, 1883) was an author, abolitionist, and minister. Born into slavery in Charles County, Maryland, he escaped to Upper Canada (now Ontario) in 1830, and founded a se...
James R. Newby
James R. Newby was a 19th-century African-American missionary to present-day Nigeria, Cameroon, and Liberia.
Newby was born to a father who was a slave freed because he was on a visit to Pennsylva...
Douglass (Washington, D.C.)
Douglass is a residential neighborhood in Southeast Washington, D.C., on the eastern side of St. Elizabeths Hospital, on the border of the Congress Heights Metro Station. It is bounded by Suitland Par...