The Fly (poem)
The Fly is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience in 1794.
Little FlyThy summer's play,My thoughtless handHas brush'd awa...
Ah! Sun-flower
"Ah! Sun-flower" is an illustrated poem written by the English poet, painter and printmaker William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience in 1794 (no.43 in the sequence...
To Fayette
"To Fayette" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge and published in the 26 December 1794 Morning Chronicle as part of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series. Coleridge, like other Romantic poets, v...
Monody on the Death of Chatterton
Monody on the Death of Chatterton was composed by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1790 and was rewritten throughout his lifetime. The poem deals with the idea of Thomas Chatterton, a poet who committed sui...
The Chimney Sweeper
"The Chimney Sweeper" is the title of two poems by William Blake, published in Songs of Innocence in 1789 and Songs of Experience in 1794. The poem "The Chimney Sweeper" is set against the dark backgr...
To Burke
To Burke is a sonnet by Samuel Taylor Coleridge first published in the 9 December 1794 Morning Chronicle. Unlike most of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters, "To Burke" describes a person whom Coleridge...
London (poem)
London is the capital of England and the United Kingdom.London may also refer to:
A Little Girl Lost
"A Little Girl Lost" is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was first published as part of his collection Songs of Innocence and of Experience in 1794. The poem is written as a clear ...
The Voice of the Ancient Bard
The Voice of the Ancient Bard is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Innocence in 1789, but later moved to Songs of Experience, the s...
To Mrs Siddons
"To Mrs Siddons" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge and published in the 29 December 1794 Morning Chronicle as part of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series. It describes Sarah Siddons, an actr...
On Receiving an Account
On Receiving an Account that his only Sister's Death was Inevitable was composed by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1794. It was written for Coleridge's friend Charles Lamb and seeks to comfort him after h...
The Tyger
"The Tyger" is a poem by the English poet William Blake published in 1794 as part of the Songs of Experience collection. Literary critic Alfred Kazin calls it "the most famous of his poems," and The C...
To Erskine
"To Erskine" or "To the Hon Mr Erskine" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in November 1794. The subject of the poem is Thomas Erskine, a lawyer and member of the Whig party that successfully serv...
To Bowles
"To Bowles" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge and published in the 26 December 1794 Morning Chronicle as part of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series. William Lisle Bowles's poetry was introd...
The Sick Rose
"The Sick Rose" is a poem by William Blake. The first publication was in 1794, when it was included in his collection titled Songs of Experience as the 39th plate. The incipit of the poem is O Rose th...
Ode to War
"Ode to War" is a satirical poem on war written in 1794 by Reverend John Whitehouse of St. John's College, Cambridge. It is part of the work Odes Moral and Descriptive.
Nurse's Song
Nurse's Song is the name of two related poems by William Blake, published in Songs of Innocence in 1789 and Songs of Experience in 1794.The poem in Songs of Innocence tells the tale of a Nurse who, we...
Holy Thursday (Songs of Experience)
"Holy Thursday" is a poem by William Blake, first published in Songs of Innocence and Experience in 1794. This poem, unlike its companion poem in "Songs of Innocence" (1789), focuses more on society a...
The Human Abstract (poem)
The Human Abstract is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience in 1794. The poem was originally drafted in Blake's notebook and...
A Poison Tree
"A Poison Tree" is a poem written by William Blake, published in 1794 as part of his Songs of Experience collection. It describes the narrator's repressed feelings of anger towards an individual, emot...
To Godwin
"To Godwin" or "To William Godwin" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge and published in the 10 January 1795 Morning Chronicle as part of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series. William Godwin was...
Introduction (Blake, 1794)
Introduction to the Songs of Experience is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was etched and published as part of his collection Songs of Innocence and of Experience in 1794.
T...
The Lily
The Lilly is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience in 1794.
The modest Rose puts forth a thorn,The humble sheep a threat...
To Priestley
"To Priestley" is a sonnet by Samuel Taylor Coleridge first published in the 11 December 1794 Morning Chronicle. Like most of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters, "To Priestley" addresses an individual ...
The Angel (Songs of Experience)
"The Angel" is a poem written by the English poet William Blake. It was published as part of his collection Songs of Experience in 1794.
Earth's Answer
Earth's Answer is a poem by William Blake within his larger collection called Songs of Innocence and of Experience (published 1794). It is the response to the previous poem in The Songs of Experience...
To Pitt
"To Pitt" was written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge and published in the 26 December 1794 Morning Chronicle as part of the Sonnets on Eminent Characters series. Describing William Pitt the Younger and hi...
Europe a Prophecy
Europe a Prophecy is a 1794 prophetic book by the British poet and illustrator William Blake. It is engraved on 18 plates, and survives in just nine known copies. It followed America a Prophecy of 179...
To a Young Ass
To a Young Ass was composed by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1794. The poem describes Coleridge's sympathies for animals and the connection to nature he felt as part of his idea of Pantisocracy. It was l...